James Joyce and Victims: Reading the Logic of Exclusion

By Sean P. Murphy | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
1.
Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, in Lewis Carroll: The Complete Illustrated Works (1872; reprint, New York: Gra- mercy, 1982), 136.
2.
Richard Ellmann, James Joyce, revised edition (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1982), 521.
3.
Hugh Kenner, Dublin's Joyce (1956; reprint, Boston: Beacon Press, 1962), 18.
4.
Ibid., 8.
5.
Claire A. Culleton, Names and Naming in Joyce (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1994), 7.
6.
Jacques Lacan, Écrits: A Selection, trans. Alan Sheridan (New York: Nor- ton, 1977), 264.
7.
René Girard, Deceit, Desire, and the Novel: Self and Other in Literary Structure, trans. Yvonne Freccero (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1965), 12.
8.
René Girard, "To Double Business Bound”: Essays on Literature, Mimesis, and Anthropology (1978; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1988), ix.
9.
Andrew McKenna's Violence and Difference (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1992) contains enlightening discussions of Girardian theory in relation to Derridean deconstruction. McKenna explores the interrelations of the victim and the supplement. See especially chapter 3, "Violence and the Origin of Language, ” 66-—115.
10.
Rosemary Jane Jolly believes that literary critics "need to develop ways of speaking about violence in literature which go beyond the safe, exclusive condem- nations of certain representations of violence.” As she explains, critics would do well to "identify how our present critical vocabulary contributes to a violent real- ity” (Colonization, Violence, and Narration in White South African Writing [Ath- ens: Ohio University Press, 1996], xiv).
11.
Redressing the critical history of separating Joyce from Marx, Jacques Aub- ert registers Joyce's indebtedness to Marx when he writes, "Joyce owed something to Marx, who is one of the `subversive writers' in whose company Stephen Deda- lus is supposed to waste his youth” (The Aesthetics of James Joyce [Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1992], 130). Contrasting Aubert's claim, Gorman suggests that Joyce gradually developed a "tepid interest” in socialism, but the interest "grew colder and colder until it congealed and was put out of mind for more important matters” (James Joyce [New York: Rinehart, 1939], 184). Gorman implies that aesthetics, a more important "matter, ” has no relation to politics. The

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