Why Are Artists Poor? The Exceptional Economy of the Arts

By Hans Abbing | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
The Selflessly Devoted Artist Are Artists Reward-Oriented?

Former Teachers and Experts Looking over the Artist's Shoulder

Alex considers himself a selfless and autonomous fine artist, but some
years ago something happened that made him rethink his position.

Alex always works with a model. He asks the model to look him in the eyes
while the model is sitting. This is an intense experience for both of them.
Alex does his best to record the experience in his drawings. While he is
drawing, the model's feelings and judgments seem to be reflected in the
model's eyes. However, Alex gradually discovered that he was also pro
jecting his own feelings onto his model. The model's eyes can turn into the
eyes of people Alex has known. Quite often, it's his father looking at him
through the model's eyes. What is brought into the drawing is a mixture of
the model, Alex and the people Alex carries inside him. In this short-term
symbiotic relationship the model and Alex fuse. There is nothing peculiar
about this symbiosis. It is Alex's little artistic trick; other artists have their
own tricks.

However, a few years ago, while Alex was drawing in this way, he had a
unique experience that relates to the present topic. Alex was drawing a
model who was also an art student. Before they began, they chatted awhile
and it turned out that the model knew a lot about drawing. Alex also got the
impression that this model was not pleased with Alex's intuitive drawing
style. His interests were more conceptual. Alex started to draw him. The
model's eyes gradually changed into those of Alex's condemning father.
And then something unexpected happened. Alex realized that it was no
longer his father looking at him but Rudi Fuchs, the director of the Stedelijk,
the most prestigious museum of modern art in the Netherlands. His eyes
certainly were not approving of what Alex had drawn thus far. (Alex cannot
remember what became of this particular drawing, which probably means
it did not turn out to his liking.)

This was a shock to Alex. It gave him an uncanny awareness of his limited
autonomy. Since then he has come to the realization that all the time he
thought he was alone in his studio with his model, there were actually many
people present looking over his shoulder. Apart from Mr. Fuchs, there were

-78-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Why Are Artists Poor? The Exceptional Economy of the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 2721

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.