Why Are Artists Poor? The Exceptional Economy of the Arts

By Hans Abbing | Go to book overview

Index of subjects
art
authentic — 25, 110
avant-garde — 68
contemporary — 68
defining — 19
— education 140, 264
high — 21
-lobby 228
low — 21
magical — 29, 303
modern — 68
mythology of — 30
sacred — 23, 111, 285
street — 199
traditional — 68
artist
authentic — 25, 110
autonomous — 87
bohemian — 127
commercial — 82-102
-craftsman 300
-entertainer 300
number of — 131
postmodern — 299
-researcher 298
reward-oriented — 94-123
selfless — 82-102
street — 199
asymmetry, cultural 21
authenticity 25, 110
autonomy 87
avant-garde 68
barrier(s)
formal — 262-297
informal — 262-279
BKR plan 133
borders in the arts 302-306
capital
cultural — 64, 262
economic — 64, 262
monetary — 64, 262
social — 64, 262
capitalism 286
pre- 286
certificate 267
classical music 162, 171-174
cognition 28
coherence, social 243
collective good 209, 215-220
commerce 39
commercial attitude 82-102, 279
compensation of poverty 147, 195
competition
— between nations 244
distorted — 176, 221
limiting — 262-279
unfair — 176, 221
constraint, survival 85
consumption, conspicuous 238
control
occupational — 266
— of numbers in the arts 263-266
convention(s) 192
cooptation 276
copyright 272
corporation(s) 190, 200
cost(s)
-disease 152-179
labor — 157-179
cultural climate 216
demand for art 167
demystification 302-309
diploma(s) 264
display
— of art 187, 237-249

-365-

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