Hunting Captain Ahab: Psychological Warfare and the Melville Revival

By Clare L. Spark | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

n interdisciplinary project of this scope and detail would have been inconceiv- Aable without the cooperation and guidance of numerous scholars, archivists, and referees, both before and after the completion of my dissertation in 1993, only a few of whom can be cited here.

First, I thank Harrison Hayford and Merton M. Sealts, Jr., who spoke candidly about their lives and work, helpfully criticized my own developing arguments, and allowed me to publish their correspondence with other Melville scholars. Similarly, the executors Mrs. Caroline Murray and Elena Pinto Simon have allowed the reader to encounter firsthand the complex minds of Henry A. Murray and Jay Leyda. Other Melville scholars have also contributed to my effort in reconstructive history; they are Sanford Marovitz, Hershel Parker, Edwin S. Shneidman, Milton Stern, G. Thomas Tanselle, Douglas Robillard, and Kris Lackey.

Second, I was fortunate in having the critical intellectual and moral support of a distinguished reading committee: Alexander Saxton, Robert Brenner, Carolyn Porter, Albert Boime, Saul Friedländer, and Katherine King. Other scholars have read nearly every draft of this constantly evolving book over the last eleven years, directing my forays into the history of social psychology and the institutional politics of academe. They are Roy Porter and Robert Nashak, who have moreover revived for me the zest, clarity, and literary qualities of the eighteenth-century English essay, which I have done my best to emulate. I might not have focused so much attention on the history of antisemitism, especially as the image of the corrosively analytic Jewish scientist has been deployed against the rationalism and libertarianism of the radical bourgeoisie, were it not for the prodding of Leo Steinberg and Albert Boime.

-ix-

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