VI

ARTHURIAN LITERATURE, ART, AND FILM, 1995—1999

Norris J. Lacy

Raymond H. Thompson

The following is an encyclopedic treatment, thorough but surely not complete, of Arthurian novels, stories, films, and other forms created between 1995 and the early months of 1999. The 1995 date was chosen because it marked the most recent version of The New Arthurian Encyclopedia (New York: Garland Publishing); since that time, there has been no systematic accounting of new Arthuriana. In addition to the titles that date from those four years, we also include some earlier material not treated elsewhere in earlier listings. Some of that material dates from the nineteenth century and earlier, but we also present discussions of the Arthurian themes and motifs in the works, for example, of Faulkner and Hemingway.

In some instances, our pages deal with new Arthurian works by authors whose previous efforts were documented in The New Arthurian Encyclopedia. Where that occurs, we have chosen not to duplicate material from that volume, but instead to include parenthetical references, identified by NAE and a page number. Those references are to the 1995 Updated Edition of the Encyclopedia.

That the flood of Arthuriana continues unabated is apparent. We present here some 150 entries, and a good many of those treat multiple titles. If there is a trend to be discerned in this compilation, it is that Arthur, of late, is rarely the subject of poetry and is absent from drama (except on the screen), whereas Arthurian themes thrive in fiction, film, and television presentations, as indeed they continue to do in popular culture, particularly in North America. Moreover, the most rapid growth in Arthurian fiction in recent years has been in the number of short stories, owing to the current popularity of thematic anthologies. The number of novels, on the other hand, has remained relatively steady for several decades.

Nonetheless, the material presented here varies a great deal in medium as well as in subject matter, from experimental novels to comics to Breton painting to German CDs. Nineteen scholars, from the United States,

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Arthurian Literature XVIII
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 255

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.