The Operas of Benjamin Britten: Expression and Evasion

By Claire Seymour | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This study began life as a Ph.D. thesis and my first debt of thanks is therefore due to tutors, colleagues and friends at the University of Kent, particularly Michael Irwin who supervised the project — and the MA dissertation which preceded it — from inception to completion, and who was a constant source of inspiration, guidance and encouragement.

I was aided throughout my research by the efficient support of the staff at the Britten—Pears Library. My many visits to the Library were immensely pleasurable and rewarding, and I should like in particular to thank Helen Risden, Judith Le Grove, Jenny Doctor and Nicholas Clark for their generous assistance.

Similarly, Anna Trussler at the Ronald Duncan Literary Institute and the archive staff at King's College Cambridge were unfailingly supportive and professional.

I am grateful to those academics, musicians and writers who made time to share their knowledge and experiences with me, including Christopher Wintle, Edward Cowie, Thomas Hemsley, Philip Langridge, Michael Holroyd, Humphrey Carpenter and Norman Platt.

Finally, I would like to thank the numerous friends with whom I have from time to time discussed aspects of the text, and whose encouragement and support has been invaluable.

The quotations from the letters and writings of Benjamin Britten are copyright the Trustees of the Britten—Pears Foundation and may not be further reproduced without the written permission of the Trustees.

The quotations from the letters of Peter Pears are copyright the executors the late Sir Peter Pears and may not be further reproduced without their written permission.

Quotations from source materials held at the Britten—Pears Library written by Myfanwy Piper, William Plomer, Montagu Slater, E. M. Forster and Ronald Duncan are reproduced courtesy of the Britten—Pears Library.

The quotations from the letters and writings of Ronald Duncan are reproduced by kind permission of the Ronald Duncan Literary Estate.

Quotations from the letters and writings of E. M. Forster are reproduced by kind permission of The Society of Authors as agent for the Provost and Scholars of King's College Cambridge.

Quotations from the operas themselves are by kind permission of Faber and Faber, and Boosey and Hawkes. Details are given below.

-vii-

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The Operas of Benjamin Britten: Expression and Evasion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Operas of Benjamin Britten - Expression and Evasion *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Permissions *
  • Abbreviations x
  • 1 - Introduction *
  • 2 - Paul Bunyan *
  • 3 - Peter Grimes *
  • 4 - The Rape of Lucretia *
  • 5 - Albert Herring *
  • 6 - The Little Sweep *
  • 7 - Billy Budd *
  • 7 - Billy Budd *
  • 8 - Gloriana *
  • 9 - The Turn of the Screw *
  • 10 - Noye's Fludde *
  • 11 - A Midsummer Night's Dream *
  • 12 - The Church Parables *
  • 13 - Owen Wingrave *
  • 14 - Death in Venice *
  • 15 - Conclusion *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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