Karl Rahner: Theology and Philosophy

By Karen Kilby | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The research behind this book began at Yale, and among the many things for which I owe a debt of gratitude to Kathryn Tanner and George Lindbeck, one is the encouragement and advice they gave on this project. David Ford, Nicholas Lash, Fergus Kerr, and Denys Turner have also, at different stages and in different ways, provided much appreciated support.

I am grateful to the members of Professor Peter Walter's Dogmatics Seminar at the University of Freiburg, whose response to an earlier version of some of the material in chapters 4 and 5 was instructive. I am particularly grateful to Philip Endean SJ for the kindness of offering me detailed disagreement with this same material.

The completion of this book has been made possible by the generosity of the University of Nottingham in providing an early sabbatical, and by the Research Leave Scheme of the Arts and Humanities Research Board.

My parents, to whom the book is dedicated, have provided the kind of support at many levels and over many years which is the condition of the possibility of the writing of a book: I am grateful to them, and also to John, Sally, Robert, and Andrew Hunton, without whom it would have been finished much earlier.

-ix-

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Karl Rahner: Theology and Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Spirit in the World 13
  • 3 - Transcendental 32
  • 4 - Hearer of the Word and the Supernatural Existential 49
  • 5 - The Relation of Philosophy to Theology 70
  • 6 - Defending a Nonfoundationalist Rahner 100
  • 7 - The Theory of the Anonymous Christian 115
  • Conclusion 127
  • Notes 129
  • Bibliography 153
  • Index 159
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