States of Knowledge: The Co-Production of Science and Social Order

By Sheila Jasanoff | Go to book overview

“distressed” colonies of the British West Indies. In Barbados and Kew, in Bridgetown and London, politicians, planters and scientists produced new plants and new ideologies together, resulting in a strongly interventionist policy of paternalistic scientific development. Today, as we again contemplate better development policies based on science in an atmosphere of more intensive globalization, it is worth considering whether or not our new ideas of development reflect a similar co-production of ideas of nature with ideologies of imperialism.


Notes
1
P. D. Curtin, The Rise and Fall of the Plantation Complex: Essays in Atlantic History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990, pp. 11-13.
2
W. K. Storey, Science and Power in Colonial Mauritius, Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 1997, pp. 4-10.
3
Curtin, Plantation Complex, p. 83. H. M. Beckles, A History of Barbados: From Amerindian Settlement to Nation-State, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990, pp. 41-42, 69.
4
R. Drayton, Nature's Government: Science, Imperial Britain, and the “Improvement” of the World, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000.
5
Drayton, Nature's Government, p. xvii.
6
Storey, Science and Power in Colonial Mauritius, pp. 97-108.
7
Beckles, Barbados, pp. 129, 148-149. R. Drayton, “Sugar Cane Breeding in Barbados: Knowledge and Power in a Colonial Context, ” A.B. Honors Thesis, Harvard University, 1986. J. H. Galloway, “Botany in the Service of Empire: The Barbados Cane-Breeding Program and the Revival of the Caribbean Sugar Industry, 1880s-1930s, ” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 86, no. 4, 1996, pp. 682-706.
8
G. K. Parris, “James W. Parris: Discoverer of Sugarcane Seedlings, ” The Garden Journal 4, no. 5, 1954, pp. 144-146.
9
Fryer to Oliver, 23 June 1871, Archives of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Miscellaneous Reports 15.6, Barbados. Sugar Cane Cultivation, Department of Agriculture, &c. 1871-1918.
10
Robinson to Derby, 29 October 1883, 5-6; “The Agricultural Society, ” Barbados Agricultural Gazette, November 1887, 46. Both these sources are found in the Archives of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Miscellaneous Reports 15.6, Barbados. Sugar Cane Experiments. 1883-1900.
11
Carrington to Dyer, 11 May 1883, 1-2; 22 November 1883, 14-15; Robinson to Dyer 28 October 1883, 3; all in Kew, Miscellaneous Reports 15.6, Barbados. Sugar Cane Experiments. 1883-1900.
12
Wingfield to Dyer, 19 November 1883, 7-11, Kew, Miscellaneous Reports 15.6, Barbados. Sugar Cane Experiments. 1883-1900.
13
Report of the Results Obtained upon the Experimental Fields at Dodds Reformatory, Kew, Miscellaneous Reports 15.6, Barbados. Sugar Cane Experiments. 1883-1900.
14
Drayton, Nature's Government, pp. 251-253.
15
S. Shapin and S. Schaffer, Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985.
16
Report of…Dodds Reformatory, 1886-1887, Kew, Miscellaneous Reports 15.6, Barbados. Sugar Cane Experiments. 1883-1900.
17
“The Agricultural Society and the Dodds Experiments, ” Barbados Agricultural Gazette, November 1887, 46, Kew, Miscellaneous Reports 15.6, Barbados. Sugar Cane Experiments. 1883-1900.
18
Harrison to Morris, 7 January 1889, 47, in Kew, Miscellaneous Reports 15.6, Barbados. Sugar Cane Cultivation, Department of Agriculture, &c. 1871-1918.
19
Report of…Dodds Reformatory, 1889, in Kew, Miscellaneous Reports 15.6, Barbados. Sugar Cane Experiments. 1883-1900. Demerara Argosy, 13 April 1889, 48, in Kew,

-128-

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