CHAPTER TWO

A nation-in-arms 1949-67

In the days, months and years that followed the 1948 War of Independence, the Israeli government had to face two supreme tasks. The first was to absorb the tide of destitute, physically and mentally handicapped Jewish immigrants, who poured copiously into the country following the British departure and Ben Gurions announcement that the 1939 White Paper and all immigration laws based upon it were null and void. 1 Ben Gurions statement was reinforced by the 'Law of Return' which was passed by the Knesset on 5 July 1950 and said, among other statements, that: 'Every Jew has the right to immigrate to the country'. This became one of the most important laws ever passed by the Israeli parliament, for it opened the gates of Israel and enabled every Jew to come and join in the attempt to build a nation and a state and to become automatically one of its citizens. 2

During the first seven and a half months of the states existence, 101,819 Jewish immigrants arrived, and they were added to in 1949 by 239,076 new arrivals, in 1950 by 170,597, in 1951 by 172,245 and between 1952 and 1955 by 92,204 Jews; in addition there were 88,338 Jewish births during these last four years. 3 Entire Jewish communities had left their homes and countries of origin and immigrated to Israel. But rather than being a voluntary step, it was often one of desperation, for the truth is that the majority of these Jews, especially those living in Middle Eastern countries, were pushed out of their native countries by outraged Arabs humiliated by the victory of the Jews in 1948, rather than being attracted by the newly established Jewish state. Thus the entire Yemenite Jewry, a total of 49,000, was transferred to Israel in 'Operation Magic Carpet' in 1949, and the majority of Iraqi Jewry, a total of 100,000, were airlifted to Israel in 'Operation Ezra and Nehemiah' between May 1950 and December 1951. 4 The Jews of Iraq formed a unique case, for they were harassed not only by the Iraqi authorities but also by Israeli agents who, in April 1950, pretending to be anti-Jewish Iraqis, threw hand grenades at the Dar al Bayda coffee house where Jews used to meet, then repeated the same exercise at the US Information Centre where young Jews often came to read, and in March 1951 struck again just outside the Masuda Shemtov synagogue. This unusual method of frightening away the Jews so that they would

-26-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Israel's Wars, 1947-93
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • List of Maps x
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations xiv
  • Chapter One - The 1947-9 War 1
  • Chapter Two - A Nation-In-Arms 1949-67 26
  • Chapter Three - The Six Bad Years 1967-73 41
  • Chapter Four - War and Peace 1973-9 66
  • Chapter Five - War in Lebanon 1982 95
  • Chapter Six - Intifada 1987-93 118
  • Chapter Seven - Conclusions 134
  • Notes 138
  • Select Bibliography 163
  • Index 166
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 173

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.