Notes

CHAPTER ONE
1.
J.K. Galbraith, The Great Crash 1929 (London, 1961) 25.
2.
On the dispute between Jews and Arabs being focused on land, see A. Horani, 'Palestine and Israel', Observer, 3 September 1967; see also J.L. Talmon, 'Israel and the Arabs', Observer, 10 September 1967; also R. Ovendale, The Origins of the Arab-Israeli Wars (London, 1984) 11.
3.
On the defeat of the Turks at the hands of the British, see B.H. Liddell Hart, History of the First World War (London, 1970) 211-13.
4.
I say 'Arab' Palestinians, but in fact there were among them Christians and people of other ethnic and religious groups.
5.
Genesis XV: 18.
6.
Pogrom is a Russian word meaning massacre. It passed from Russian into the English language with the specialized meaning of a massacre of Jews. Pogroms became part of the life of the Jews in Europe. In Poland, for example, in 1648-58, at least 100,000 Jews were massacred. In the Ukraine, between 1917 and 1920, at least 75,000 Jews were slaughtered, as well as smaller numbers in some of the newly independent nations of Eastern Europe; on this, see B. Lewis, Semites and Anti-Semites (London, 1986) 60,77.
7.
C. Weizmann, Excerpts from His Historic Statements: Writings and Addresses (The Jewish Agency for Palestine, New York, 1952) 48.
8.
This statement was coined by the Anglo-Jewish writer Yisrael Zwangwill, a leading Zionist; see 'The return to Palestine', New Liberal Review II, December 1901, 627.
9.
A. Elon, 'Israel and the end of Zionism', The NewYork Review, 19 December 1996, 22.
10.
A. Elon, The Israelis: Founders and Sons (London, 1983) 172.
11.
The Complete Diaries of Theodore Herzl Vol. I (NewYork, 1960) 343 (entry for 12 June 1895). On the possibility of transfer of the Arabs of Palestine, see M. Laqueur, A History of Zionism (NewYork, 1989) 231-2. Theodore Herzl was, in fact, willing to give up Palestine altogether and accept the proposal put to him in 1903 by the British Minister for the Colonies, Joseph Chamberlain, to have Uganda as an alternative to Palestine. But Herzl was vigorously opposed by Russian Zionists, and in the end gave up the idea of acquiring any place but Palestine.
12.
Estimates of the number of Jews in Palestine are unreliable and vary. The figure of 85,000 Jews is also quoted in D. McDowall, The Palestinians: Minority Rights Group Report no. 24 (London, 1975) 7. A British census of 1918 gives an estimate of 700,000 Arabs and 56,000 Jews in Palestine; see P. Mansfield, The Arabs (London, 1992) 173.

-138-

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Israel's Wars, 1947-93
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • List of Maps x
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations xiv
  • Chapter One - The 1947-9 War 1
  • Chapter Two - A Nation-In-Arms 1949-67 26
  • Chapter Three - The Six Bad Years 1967-73 41
  • Chapter Four - War and Peace 1973-9 66
  • Chapter Five - War in Lebanon 1982 95
  • Chapter Six - Intifada 1987-93 118
  • Chapter Seven - Conclusions 134
  • Notes 138
  • Select Bibliography 163
  • Index 166
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