The Postcolonial Jane Austen

By You-Me Park; Rajeswari Sunder Rajan | Go to book overview

publications include Recreating Ourselves: African Women and Critical Transformations (Africa World Press, 1994) and the co-edited two-volume anthology of black women's writing, Moving Beyond Boundaries (New York University Press, 1995).

You-me Park teaches in the English Department at the George Washington University, Washington, DC. She has published in Positions, American Literature, Restoration, and in various collections on gender, postcoloniality, and East Asian studies. She is presently completing a book on gender, sexuality and labour in postcolonial Korea.

Julianne Pidduck is a lecturer in the Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies at the University of Glasgow. She specializes in feminist readings of popular culture, and is currently completing a book on feminist costume drama.

Judith Plotz is Professor of English at the George Washington University. She is currently completing a book, Romanticism and the Vocation of Childhood, to be published by St Martin's Press.

Rajeswari Sunder Rajan was until recently a Senior Fellow at the Nehru Memorial Museum and Library, New Delhi, and will shortly be taking up an appointment at the University of Oxford. Her publications include (ed.) The Lie of the Land: English Literary Studies in India (Oxford, 1992), Real and Imagined Women: Gender, Culture and Postcolonialism (Routledge, 1993) and (ed.) Signposts: Gender Issues in Post-Independence India (Kali for Women, 1999). She is a Joint Editor of Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies.

Clara Tuite lectures in the Department of English at the University of Melbourne, Australia. She is an associate editor of the Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age (1999), ed. Iain McCalman, and co-editor, with Gillian Russell, of the forthcoming Romantic Sociability: Social Networks and Literary Culture in Britain (1770-1840) (Cambridge University Press). She is currently completing a book on Austen, Romanticism and canonicity.

Gayle Wald is Assistant Professor of English at the George Washington University. Her book Crossing the Line: Racial Passing in Twentieth-Century US Literature and Culture was recently published by Duke University Press.

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The Postcolonial Jane Austen
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Austen in the World 3
  • Part II - Austen at Home 27
  • 2 - Jane Austen Goes to the Seaside 29
  • 3 - Learning to Ride at Mansfield Park 56
  • 4 - Austen's Treacherous Ivory 74
  • 5 - Domestic Retrenchment and Imperial Expansion 93
  • 6 - Of Windows and Country Walks 116
  • Part III - Austen Abroad 139
  • 7 - Reluctant Janeites 141
  • 8 - Jane Austen Goes to India 163
  • 9 - Farewell to Jane Austen 189
  • 10 - Father's Daughters 205
  • 11 - Clueless in the Neo-Colonial World Order 218
  • Part IV - Poem 235
  • To a 'Jane Austen' Class at Ibadan University 237
  • Index 239
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