Self-Evaluation in the Global Classroom

By John MacBeath; Hidenori Sugimine | Go to book overview

22

Postscript

John MacBeath

In June 2002 eighteen students arrived in Cambridge to report on the further adventures of Learning School 3. They arrived from Japan late on Wednesday evening and having presented their findings, left on Thursday afternoon for Zlin in the Czech Republic for the final international meeting of the Global Classroom and the Learning School.

Those who were present at the Cambridge seminar described it variously as 'astonishing', 'ground breaking' and 'deeply moving'. It would have been impossible to have been unmoved by the students' graphic descriptions of life in a South African township, the warmth and generosity of people defined not by what they had (nothing) but what they were (everything). It would have been impossible to be unmoved by their accounts of the juxtaposition of corrugated shacks with the grandeur of the Olympic stadia, travelling daily between the extreme poverty of township people and the affluence of the white and 'coloured' South Africans. They discovered how unique their insights were into these two worlds when they were told by white South Africans that, despite living in Cape Town all their lives, they had never ventured into the townships. As one student said: 'It took us, students, from Shetland and Sweden and Germany to tell them what life was like in their own back yard.'

They found themselves doing an educational job with white and 'coloured' South Africans whose knowledge vacuum was filled with racist stereotypes but often had to admit defeat because, as one student said: 'They still only see what they want to see.'

A German girl spoke powerfully of living with a Korean family who spoke not a word of English or German but, nonetheless, they came to be so close to one another that language and cultural barriers were dissolved. Like LS1 and LS2 students before them, they spoke of how deeply their lives and thinking had been changed by the experience of different cultures, different mores, different expectations, different schools. A Korean student told us how, for the first time in his life, at the age of 17, he had learned how to discuss. In all his school life no teacher had ever promoted discussion and it took him months of living with the Learning School to learn how to express his own view and listen to the views of others. He also described eight hours every day of intensive after-school study, as passionate commitment to achievement with the reflective, critical

-229-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Self-Evaluation in the Global Classroom
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures ix
  • List of Tables xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - The Learning School 3
  • 1 - The Story Begins 5
  • 2 - What We Did 15
  • 3 - Tools for Schools 27
  • 4 - A Lifetime of Learning (In One Year) 36
  • 5 - The Impact on the Schools 50
  • 6 - Expert Witnesses 65
  • Part II - Insights into the School Experience from the Learning School Students 73
  • 7 - A Place Called School 75
  • 8 - The School Day 84
  • 9 - Layouts for Learning 92
  • 10 - Subjects, Subjects, Subjects 98
  • 11 - Lessons, Lessons, Lessons 110
  • 12 - Who Do You Learn Most From? 117
  • 13 - Who Likes School? 125
  • 14 - Two Classes Compared 137
  • 15 - It All Depends on Your Point of View 149
  • 16 - A Life in the Day of Three Students 161
  • 17 - No Two the Same 175
  • 18 - Talking About Learning 183
  • 19 - Learning Out of School 203
  • 20 - Students and Their Parents 209
  • 21 - Lifelong Learning 219
  • 22 - Postscript 229
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 235
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 241

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.