Inconceivable Conceptions: Psychological Aspects of Infertility and Reproductive Technology

By Jane Haynes; Juliet Miller | Go to book overview

Chapter 14

Egg donation

The mission to have a child

Sue Stuart-Smith

Sue Stuart-Smith is Specialist Registrar in Psychotherapy at the Tavistock Clinic and the Royal Free Hospital.

'You have a mission to have a child and that's your absolute goal and so like any other mission you look at the ways you can achieve that, and you set about achieving it.'

(Spoken by Caroline)

Embarking on egg donation treatment is for many women like Caroline a new phase in what has been a long and painful quest to have a child. Preceding this they have experienced years of infertility, with failed IVF (in vitro fertilisation) treatments using their own eggs, before reaching a point at which their capacity to produce viable eggs has diminished. For other women, egg donation is and always has been the only prospect they have of achieving a pregnancy. These are women who for a variety of reasons do not have functioning ovaries. For some it is due to a premature menopause or a genetic disorder. For others it is because their ovaries have been damaged as a result of treatment for cancer in childhood or early adulthood: the chemo- or radiotherapy which has ensured their survival has also left them sterile. Couples in any of these situations are faced with a choice of accepting childlessness or considering either egg donation or adoption. Unlike adoption, egg donation offers the possibility for the male partner of becoming a genetic father, and for the woman offers the experience of pregnancy and childbirth and thereby the possibility of being a biological if not genetic mother.

The clinical material presented in this chapter is taken from two cases, both of which are part of an ongoing research project which the author is carrying out. The research project is a qualitative study of women receiving IVF treatment using donated eggs. The study involves carrying out in-depth, semi-structured interviews with women after they have received counselling at the clinic where they are being treated and before the egg donation treatment commences. At a later date some of the women will be followed up. Because the qualitative analysis and the data collection are still taking place it is not possible in this contribution to present a systematic account of the women's experiences. Instead the discussion will focus on material from two women, Caroline and Sarah. These two have been chosen because they illustrate two different routes to egg donation treatment. In order to

-166-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Inconceivable Conceptions: Psychological Aspects of Infertility and Reproductive Technology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements x
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 3
  • Chapter 2 - Assisted Reproductive Technology and the Fertility Clinic 11
  • Experiencing Infertility 17
  • Chapter 3 - Clinical Waste 19
  • Chapter 4 - One Man's Story 27
  • Psychological Aspects 31
  • Chapter 5 - Eros and Art 33
  • Notes 45
  • Chapter 6 - Mourning the Never Born and the Loss of the Angel 47
  • Chapter 7 - The Battle with Mortality and the Urge to Procreate 60
  • Bibliography 72
  • Chapter 8 - Myths and Reality in Male Infertility 73
  • Bibliography 84
  • Chapter 9 - Love, Hate and the Generative Couple 86
  • Changing Patterns of Kinship 103
  • Chapter 10 - The Story of Seth's Egg 105
  • Chapter 11 - Seth 109
  • Chapter 12 - Gifts of Life in Absentia 120
  • Chapter 13 - Women's Work 143
  • Bibliography 165
  • Chapter 14 - Egg Donation 166
  • The Shadow 179
  • Chapter 15 - Dark Reflections 181
  • Afterword 205
  • Chapter 16 - Afterword 207
  • Appendix 217
  • Glossary of Terms Used in Art (Assisted Reproductive Technology) 219
  • Index 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 229

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.