Primary School Management: Learning from Experience: Case Studies by Primary and Middle School Headteachers

By Eric Briault; Neville West | Go to book overview

Introduction to the Studies

Towards good management
The experience arising from our association with the management programmes provided by the Management and Professional Development Unit of the University of Sussex leads us to believe that a range of case studies written by Headteachers who have taken part in the programmes may serve to illuminate and inform the essential principles of the management role of a Primary School Headteacher. The programmes to which we principally refer are the One Term Training Opportunity (OTTO) initiatives, attended by experienced Heads, and the 20-day programmes designed by them as part of their full-time term release. Such programmes are now implemented under alternative funding, but the acronym 'OTTO' has been retained to denote the particular features of these programmes. We have taken the view that the presentation of groups of case studies, together with commentaries upon each of the groups, would provide Primary School Headteachers and those preparing for headship with material likely to be directly relevant and useful to their role. The book is directly aimed at such a constituency, together with those engaged in headship management training and those professionally advising Heads and schools. We see also a body of useful material which might be drawn upon in training programmes for school governors.
A symposium in four sections
We therefore invited sixteen Heads to provide a case study based on their own experience, under one of four sections into which we have structured this symposium. Each invited Head received from us a brief under one of the following headings:
1. Improving the quality of pupils' learning experiences.
2. Staff organization and development.
3. Policy and the management of resources.
4. The head, the school and the community.

The headship role
In the introduction to each of these sections we give a short summary of the brief given to the Headteachers concerned and go on to indicate the themes of each of the four case studies. After each case study, we invite the reader to consider the wider implications of the study, its relevance to the reader's own circumstances and to the changing situation since the passing of the Education Reform Act (1988). To assist in such consideration, we offer a short comment and one or two possible questions which might be asked. Following the studies in each section we offer a commentary intended not merely (or even mainly) to comment on the studies, but intended rather to seek to place the experience described in the broad context of our understanding of the essential nature of the headship role. Three themes underlie this understanding:
The concept of leadership.
The Head as manager.
The changing relationship between those responsible for education in England and Wales.

The in-school leadership role

It may be agreed that there is a spectrum of leadership styles, frequently cited in management literature, ranging from the authoritarian through the consultative to the 'primus inter pares' stance. We would argue that it is inappropriate to define leadership in terms of particular traits. Effective leadership is more to do with the adoption of an appropriate leadership style given the context and the goal to be achieved. Equally, given that management is about the achievement of goals through other people, the leader needs to be aware of the degree of maturity of the individual concerned in relation to tasks to be undertaken. Typologies of leadership may, however, assist in the process of constructing a repertoire of styles appropriate to task and situation. In presenting this view we acknowledge the concept of situational leadership developed by Hersey and Blanchard (1982). It may well be the case that Heads as managers need to develop a capacity to move beyond their preferred leadership style. This will involve the Headteacher in a consideration of the weight

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Primary School Management: Learning from Experience: Case Studies by Primary and Middle School Headteachers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Glossary of Terms vi
  • Introduction to the Studies 1
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 101

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.