America Embattled: September 11, Anti-Americanism, and the Global Order

By Richard Crockatt | Go to book overview

Preface

There can be no doubting the enormity of the terrorist attacks of September 11, whether one is referring to their costs to human individuals or to their impact on the larger fabric of American life. America has been shaken to its core. Moreover, because the United States lies at the center of world politics and the global economic system, because the nations of the world are increasingly interdependent, and because the full horror of the attacks on New York City and Washington, DC was played out on television around the world, the impact of these events was inescapably global. People around the world have as much at stake in what happens now as do the people of the United States.

No single analysis can hope to encompass all the ramifications of September 11. What follows focuses firstly on what these events reveal about the United States, its history, and present foreign policies, including American and overseas perceptions of the United States' international role. Despite the vast volume of the information about the United States that daily floods our media, or perhaps in part because of it, America remains a baffling presence to many observers. In this book, I look behind some of the cruder stereotypes of the United States with the aim of understanding the country from the inside. The second area of concern is the global political system, the environment in which American foreign policy is pursued. The relationship between these two fields constitutes the subject of the book. The main claim of the book is that September 11 must be understood in the light of the interaction between America's dominant international position since the end of the Cold War, the rise of political Islam, and the complex set of phenomena that comes under the heading of globalization. These are themselves admittedly large questions involving a range of themes, each of which merits book-length study. These include, besides the politics and history of the United States, globalization,

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
America Embattled: September 11, Anti-Americanism, and the Global Order
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • September 11, 2001 1
  • 1 - How America Sees the World 7
  • 2 - How the World Sees America 39
  • 3 - The Roots of Terror 72
  • 4 - The Limits of Governance 108
  • 5 - Responding to Terror 136
  • Conclusion 162
  • Notes 167
  • Bibliography 186
  • Index 195
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 207

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.