Eastern Europe at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century: A Guide to the Economies in Transition

By Ian Jeffries | Go to book overview

7

Slovakia

POLITICS

The ethnic Hungarian minority and Slovakia's relations with Hungary

On the international front the controversy over the Gabcikovo Dam on the Danube continues to sour relations with Hungary. (The dam is also in an area of Slovakia where Hungarians predominate.) Hungary and Czechoslovakia had jointly signed an agreement in 1977, but Hungary stopped work on the scheme in 1989 after a powerful campaign by environmentalists and formally withdrew in May 1992. On 24 October 1992 the Slovak government (the Czechs wanted a delay) went ahead with the plan to divert water from the Danube as part of the hydro-electric power scheme. Hungary complained that the diversion also violated the international border. The EC intervened and a temporary deal was made regarding work on the power plant and the amount of water diverted. In April 1993 Hungary agreed to refer the dispute to the International Court of Justice at The Hague. The verdict was delivered on 25 September 1997.

The court has concluded that both parties committed internationally wrongful acts … Hungary and Slovakia must negotiate in good faith … and must take all the necessary measures to achieve the objectives of the 1977 treaty … The issue of compensation could satisfactorily be resolved in the framework of an overall settlement, if each of the parties were to renounce or cancel all financial claims.

The court ruled that both countries should operate the dam jointly (with Hungary paying part of the building and operating costs) and take environmental considerations into account. (The dam accounts for around 10 per cent of Slovakia's electricity generation: FT, 26 September 1997, p. 2.) On 6 February 1998 Hungary announced that it was to build a new dam to support Slovakia's Gabcikovo. But on 3 September 1998 the Slovak government announced that it had decided to return the dispute to the International Court of Justice at The Hague. Slovakia claimed that Hungary was not complying with

-348-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eastern Europe at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century: A Guide to the Economies in Transition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables xii
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Introduction and Overview 1
  • Part I - The Countries of Eastern Europe 65
  • 1 - Albania 67
  • 2 - Bulgaria 116
  • 3 - The Czech Republic 156
  • 4 - Hungary 202
  • 5 - Poland 240
  • 6 - Romania 297
  • 7 - Slovakia 348
  • Part II - General Issues 381
  • 8 - General Issues in the Transition from Command to Market Economies 383
  • Bibliography 416
  • Index 433
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 441

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.