Korean Society: Civil Society, Democracy, and the State

By Charles K. Armstrong | Go to book overview

8


Protestant Christianity and the state

Religious organizations as civil society

Donald N. Clark

Introduction

Christian communities in South Korea are outstanding examples of civil society, as the term is generally understood. 1 They have always drawn their inspiration and power from impulses that are essentially non-political, at least in the sense of being strongly resistant to state domination. Their membership patterns cut across the political spectrum and are not defined by political labels. They provide arenas for tolerance, negotiation of differences, and internal training of new leaders. In The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of the World Order (see Chapter 1, p. 13), Samuel Huntington has much to say about the power of religion to shape the processes of modernization and revitalization, for example, in the Islamic world. Islam, however, is the traditional creed in the Middle East. Christianity started out as an ideology that was foreign to Korea, and there is much to ponder in the way it has been accepted, absorbed, and even transformed by the Korean people. This is especially so when one compares Korea with Japan and China, where Christianity also has a dramatic history but has never accounted for more than a small percentage of the religious population. The fact that approximately 25 percent of South Koreans identify themselves as Christians raises questions about the nature of Korean society, the process by which Christianity was introduced to Korea, the interaction between Christian propagation and events and trends in modern Korean history, and the link between Christian ideology and political authority.

Christianity as a model of civil society at work

In many ways Korea's Christian communities act as models of civil society. They comprise a remarkable number and variety of associational “cells” in the form of church congregations that cohere because of particular denominational, historical, regional, and class and income factors. These “cells” meet, recruit and induct new members, train leaders, follow rituals, share beliefs, and strive toward common organizational goals cooperatively and without much interference from the outside. Taken as a whole, Korea's

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Korean Society: Civil Society, Democracy, and the State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.