Where No Flag Flies: Donald Davidson and the Southern Resistance

By Mark Royden Winchell | Go to book overview
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Where No Flag Flies: Donald Davidson and the Southern Resistance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Where No Flag Flies *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Part One - The Athens of the South (1893—1924) *
  • 1 - Middle Tennessee 3
  • 2 - Twentieth Avenue 18
  • 3 - Over There 32
  • 4 - Robin Gallivant 48
  • 5 - Demon Brother 63
  • Part Two - Paradise Reclaimed (1924—1936) *
  • 6 - Two Cheers for Modernism 89
  • 7 - Ubi Sunt 101
  • 8 - Angry as Wasp Music 118
  • 9 - Some Versions of Pastoral 133
  • 10 - The Long Campaign 147
  • Part Three - The Memory Keeper (1936—1950) *
  • 11 - Agrarian Poetics 167
  • 12 - Taking Their Country Back 184
  • 13 - Good Fences Make Good Neighbors 201
  • 14 - The Last Agrarian 217
  • 15 - A Tale of Two Rivers 234
  • Part Four - Mr. Davidson (1950—1968) *
  • 16 - A Joyful Noise 261
  • 17 - Who Speaks for the White Man? 282
  • 18 - Where No Flag Flies 300
  • 19 - The Last Fugitive 316
  • 20 - Down This Long Street 338
  • Bibliography 361
  • Index 371
  • Acknowledgments 386
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