Africa and the Victorians: The Climax of Imperialism in the Dark Continent

By Ronald Robinson; John Gallagher et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
The Revolt of the Afrikaner 1877-1881

T he south African crisis which led to the first Boer War of 1880-1, occurred because the British government claimed to be the paramount authority and trustee of south Africa, and the trek Boers rejected the claim. This clash between a liberal, multi-racial imperialism and a racialist republicanism had a long history.1 For thirty years after the British had taken the Cape Colony in order to secure the route to the East, their rule had been more often pro-Bantu than pro- Boer. The Colonial Office under James Stephen earnestly carried out its duty of protecting the Bantu tribes against 'the cupidity...and crimes of that adventurous class of Europeans who lead the way in penetrating the territory of uncivilized man'.2 Imperial officials had attempted to impose liberal, Christian standards upon the Boer colonists in their relations with the coloured and Bantu population. The slaves were freed. Masters were restrained. Servants were given liberty of contract and equality in the courts, the tribes protected in possession of their lands, and the principle of political equality was laid down.3 It was not a purely humanitarian policy, for the Colonial Office was convinced that without justice there could be no peace on colonial frontiers, no security within them, no economy in defence or growth of trade. Partly to protect the Bantu and partly to avoid expense, the British tried to stop the spread of colonisation. The Cape route could be secured without meddling in the interior. The colony was to be restricted to the purpose of guarding the naval base at Simon's Town. But trusteeship and restriction broke against the local environment. The Boer frontiersmen, hungry for land and determined to preserve

____________________
1
Much of the argument in this chapter is based on the research of Professor C. W. de Kiewiet into British colonial policy in South Africa, especially his British Colonial Policy and the South African Republics, 1848-1872, ( 1929), and The Imperial Factor in South Africa, ( 1937); and Professor E. A. Walker work, especially A History of South Africa, ( 2nd ed., 1941), and Lord de Villiers and His Times, ( 1925).
2
Report: Aborigines (British Settlements), H. of C. 425), P.P. ( 1837) VII, 75.
3
vide The Cape of Good Hope Constitution Ordinance, Order in Council, 11 Mar. 1853.

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Africa and the Victorians: The Climax of Imperialism in the Dark Continent
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 491

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.