Show Me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication

By Chris Roush | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A lot of people offered great advice to make this book the best reference guide possible for new and experienced business reporters.

I thank Jan Yopp, who heads the news-editorial program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, for looking at the proposal for this book, offering suggestions, and providing some guidance on the textbook-writing process; Cindy Elmore, a former business journalist who was a graduate student in Chapel Hill and who is now a journalism professor at East Carolina University, for reviewing early chapters and the proposal and making suggestions; Carol Pardun, another UNC faculty member, for giving me the name and phone number of Linda Bathgate, an editor at Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, a well-known mass-communication textbook publisher. Linda enthusiastically took on the project and made me feel welcome.

I also thank two colleagues, Pamela Luecke at Washington & Lee University and Marty Steffens at the University of Missouri, who teach business journalism classes, for reviewing the proposal and some chapters. Both suggested additional chapters, as well as other topics that needed to be covered, to make the book more complete. Their teaching expertise and knowledge were invaluable. In addition, Rusty Todd at the University of Texas at Austin reviewed the entire manuscript and made suggestions. Professors at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina also reviewed some of the chapters and made similar comments and suggestions.

Parts of the text were shown to professional journalists, including Adam Levy of Bloomberg News, online journalists Michael Crittenden and Dail Willis, among others, to get a sense of what they would want in such a book. In addition, Keith Allen, an accounting research manager at Coca-Cola Company, reviewed chapter 4, which contains recent examples of the company's financial statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement. I appreciate all of their comments and suggestions.

I thank Dean Richard Cole, who runs the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Chapel Hill, for his enthusiastic support of my interest in business journalism education and for giving his approval to the creation of the Carolina Business News Initiative, a program designed to teach students and professionals.

I thank the Society of American Business Editors and Writers and the National Newspaper Association for allowing me to judge some of their business writing

-xiii-

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Show Me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Lea's Communication Series *
  • Show Me the Money - Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication *
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Why Business Reporting is Important 1
  • 2 - Building a Foundation 22
  • 3 - The Economy and Business 48
  • 4 - The Basics of Company Financial Reporting 77
  • 5 - Writing Company News 109
  • 6 - Mergers and Acquisitions 136
  • 7 - Wall Street and Ipos 161
  • 8 - The Executive Suite 193
  • 9 - Private and Small Companies 218
  • 10 - Nonprofit Organizations 243
  • 11 - Business in the Courthouse 270
  • 12 - Bankruptcy Court 300
  • 13 - Writing About Real Estate 327
  • 14 - State and Federal Regulatory Agencies 349
  • 15 - Finding Information on the Internet 385
  • Glossary 408
  • Index 423
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