Show Me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication

By Chris Roush | Go to book overview

10

Nonprofit Organizations

OPERATING LIKE A FOR-PROFIT BUSINESS

So far this book has ignored one important segment of the business world, and one that is often underreported because of its unique structure. But there are thousands of businesses and other organizations operating like businesses, offering goods or services to the public, that do not fit into the structure of being a public company or a for-profit private enterprise.

There are more than 1.3 million entities in this country that are classified as nonprofit organizations by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Collectively, nearly a half million of them file financial disclosures with the IRS that show they have more than $2.7 trillion in assets, according to the National Center for Charitable Statistics. California has the most nonprofit organizations, whereas New York's nonprofit organizations have the most reported assets.

These nonprofit organizations include everything from the National Council of YMCAs and the American Red Cross and Goodwill Industries International to local child care centers, homeless shelters, health insurance plans, community health care clinics, museums, hospitals, churches, schools, performing arts centers, and conversation groups. They are some of the largest organizations in a town or a

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Show Me the Money: Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Lea's Communication Series *
  • Show Me the Money - Writing Business and Economics Stories for Mass Communication *
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Why Business Reporting is Important 1
  • 2 - Building a Foundation 22
  • 3 - The Economy and Business 48
  • 4 - The Basics of Company Financial Reporting 77
  • 5 - Writing Company News 109
  • 6 - Mergers and Acquisitions 136
  • 7 - Wall Street and Ipos 161
  • 8 - The Executive Suite 193
  • 9 - Private and Small Companies 218
  • 10 - Nonprofit Organizations 243
  • 11 - Business in the Courthouse 270
  • 12 - Bankruptcy Court 300
  • 13 - Writing About Real Estate 327
  • 14 - State and Federal Regulatory Agencies 349
  • 15 - Finding Information on the Internet 385
  • Glossary 408
  • Index 423
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