Sport, Politics, and Literature in the English Renaissance

By Gregory M. Colón Semenza | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

MANY THANKS TO THE MEMBERS OF A HEALTHY RENAISSANCE COMmunity at the Pennsylvania State University, where this project was conceived: Patrick Cheney, Laura Knoppers, Guido Ruggiero, Garrett Sullivan, and especially Linda Woodbridge contributed to and helped shape whatever is good in this book.

Thanks also to those individuals who have spoken to me about the project, read parts of the manuscript, or otherwise provided support along the way: Dan Beaver, Robert Colón, Teresa Colón, Richard Cunningham, Frances Dolan, James Ehrenberg, Sean Grass, Chad Hayton, Kit Hume, Jennifer Low, Leah Marcus, Richard A. McCabe, Ryan Netzley, Gail Kern Paster, Jonathan Sawday, Winfried Schleiner, Greg Semenza, Sr., Marti Semenza, Alan Stewart, Catherine Thomas, and Jennifer van Frank. Michael Schoenfeldt read the entire manuscript and offered useful feedback while the project was still young. My colleagues at the University of Connecticut, Raymond Anselment, Frederick Biggs, Elizabeth Hart, and Jean Marsden, volunteered honest and invaluable advice at a later stage.

For permission to reprint, I am grateful to SEL, published by Johns Hopkins University Press, which published a shorter version of chapter 6 in volume 42 (2002); to Renaissance Quarterly, which published an earlier version of chapter 2 in volume 54 (2001); and to Prose Studies, published by Frank Cass Publishers, which published an earlier and shorter version of chapter 1 in volume 23 (2001). At the University of Delaware Press, I should like to thank editor Donald C. Mell, and also the anonymous readers, who provided such helpful suggestions for revision.

My greatest debt is to my wife, Cristina, who has demonstrated, since I began writing this book, the sort of toughness and endurance that would put even the greatest of athletes to shame.

-7-

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