A Long Way to Go: Conversations about Race by African American Faculty and Graduate Students

By Darrell Cleveland | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Lee Jones

As I reflect on the espoused mission and goals of the academy, I am reminded of the countless people—seen and unseen, heard and unheard—who have impacted my life. I often tell my students of various races and backgrounds, “Be careful in selecting your careers because there will be times when you will question your sanity about why you selected that particular profession.”

I also tell them, “You should never work in an environment if you do not feel good about getting out of bed and coming to work.” I have held to this credo for nearly twenty years; but one of the things I did not understand when I decided to live by this creed was that the academy can be a plethora of contradictions. On the one hand, it takes the stance that it is one of the most liberal and democratic of organizational enterprises. On the other hand, it rarely accepts the challenge of looking at its practices and seeing the constant injustices it inflicts upon African American and other underrepresented groups.

The high-profile public debate surrounding our mentor, scholar, and statesman Cornel West gives cause to reflect on how far we have actually not come in the academy. Whether one agrees with his ideology or not, the mere fact that Harvard University challenged him not only to examine how he spends his time but also to conform to the status quo is mind-boggling and extremely discouraging. Such a situation makes it very difficult to encourage aspiring African American graduate students to choose higher education as a profession. It's discouraging because Cornel West represents the true essence of a scholar. What he postulates is sound; his work truly presents opportunities for critical dialogue among scholars in the

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Long Way to Go: Conversations about Race by African American Faculty and Graduate Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 275

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.