A Long Way to Go: Conversations about Race by African American Faculty and Graduate Students

By Darrell Cleveland | Go to book overview

6

BEYOND THE SILENCED DIALOGUE:
WHAT WE TELL OURSELVES WHEN THE
WHITE ACADEMY AIN'T HEARIN'US

Sherick Hughes


Prologue

In graduate school, I perceive my place to be betwixt and between as a “native” son, a homeboy who has individual educational accomplishments for which the Black community hoped, and struggled. I also perceive myself as a source espousing and acting out new understandings to my own family that sometimes confirms current family practices and sometimes challenges them—a situation that can breed suspicion, defensiveness, questions about my naiveté, and their hopes that I have not gone too far in the White academy to approach real-life situations productively. I am plagued with why the latter generation of African American Ph.D. candidates faces the same or similar struggles while attending what seem to be, on the surface, more liberal predominantly White institutions (PWIs). Possible answers may lie in the study of the educational plight of this particular community.

This essay discusses the educational struggles, resiliency, and hope of African Americans students on the journey to the professorate. It is my attempt to maintain a conscience. It is an attempt to offer a perspective necessary to question the creation and re-creation of environments that perpetuate the systemic silencing of African American graduate students. It is a commencement of a journey to not lose sight of my impetus to promote and seek understanding that helps the social reality that produced me, a reminder to be cautious of my imminent elite status, and an attempt to expose any shallow tributaries to the sea of knowledge about the graduate education of African Americans at PWIs.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Long Way to Go: Conversations about Race by African American Faculty and Graduate Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 275

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.