A Long Way to Go: Conversations about Race by African American Faculty and Graduate Students

By Darrell Cleveland | Go to book overview

19

AN EMERGING ENGAGEMENT,
RETENTION, AND ADVANCEMENT (ERA)
MODEL FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN
ADMINISTRATORS AT PREDOMINANTLY
WHITE INSTITUTIONS

Jerlando F. L. Jackson

Although many individual colleges and universities are giving attention to retaining African Americans, key stakeholders remain concerned with institutional commitment to diversity (Cabrera et al., 1999; Holmes et al., 2000; Jackson & Rosas, 1999). Indeed, these institutions have focused on retention for African Americans, especially of students and faculty (Jackson, 2001). Some institutions concerned about increasing the overall diversity of their campuses have taken a three-tiered approach—students, faculty, and administrators. For example, the Board of Regents for the University of Wisconsin System has committed to increase the number of faculty, staff, and administrators of color in addition to increasing the numbers of students of color (University of Wisconsin System Plan 2008, 1998). The reporters who monitor higher and postsecondary education have tagged access, retention, and advancement for African Americans in predominantly White institutions (PWIs) as an area of concern and a hot topic for debate (Bennefield, 1999; Black Issues in Higher Education, 1999). Further, research-based responses to these questions of access, retention, and advancement have redirected attention toward considering the retention for African American administrators as a benchmark for institutional commitment to diversity (Davis, 1994; Jackson, 2001).

Higher and postsecondary education literature abounds with recommendations for retaining African American students and faculty; however, little empirical or practice-based knowledge is provided for retaining African American administrators (Jackson & Flowers, 2003). A major challenge for colleges and universities in engaging, retaining, and advancing (ERA) African American administrators is

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Long Way to Go: Conversations about Race by African American Faculty and Graduate Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 275

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.