Mississippi: A Documentary History

By Bradley G. Bond | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
ANTEBELLUM SLAVERY

During the early eighteenth century, French colonists began importing slaves from Africa and Caribbean islands into the colony of Louisiana. By 1724, a sufficient number of slaves lived in the colony to justify the creation of a law code—the Code Noir—which defined the rights and responsibilities of owners and slaves alike. Although slaves arrived early in the colonial period, sustained growth in the slave population did not occur until the 1790s, when white planters shifted away from tobacco and indigo production and began to plant cotton on a large scale. As Mississippi farmers planted more and more cotton, the demand for slaves increased. Census reports illustrate the increased presence of slave labor. Before the great cotton boom, a Spanish census of the Natchez District taken in 1784 counted 1,619 whites and 500 blacks; a census completed in 1796 found 5,318 whites and 2,100 blacks in the District. By 1820, slaves constituted 43.5 percent of the new state's population, and by 1860, more than 436,000 slaves, or just over 55 percent of the state's total population, lived in Mississippi.

Throughout the antebellum period, slaves built Mississippi. They maintained roads, constructed levees, drained swamplands, washed, cooked, cleaned, tended livestock, and worked at various jobs that required skilled labor. The vast majority of slaves, however, cultivated cotton and other row crops on plantations and farms. Whether they lived on a vast plantation or a small farm, the lives of slaves consisted largely of work, short rations, and

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mississippi: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.