Mississippi: A Documentary History

By Bradley G. Bond | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER 1
1
True Relation of the Hardships Suffered By Governor Don Hernando De Soto and Certain Portuguese Gentlemen in the Discovery of the Province of Florida. Now Newly Set Forth by a Gentleman of Elvas in The De Soto Chronicles: The Expedition of Hernando De Soto to North America in 1539–1543, edited by Lawrence A. Clayton, Vernon James Knight, Jr., and Edward C. Moore. Vol. 1 of 2 (Tuscaloosa and London: University of Alabama Press, 1993), 104–13.
2
Chicaca was an Indian village, likely located near Cotton Gin Port, that included nearly 200 residencies.
3
Mavilla was a large Indian village located north of modern-day Mobile, Alabama. Soto and his men had recently fled Mavilla after massacring Indians there.
4
“Cacique, ” the word Spaniards used to describe indigenous West Indian and North American chiefs, derives from the Haitian word for “lord.”
5
Sauechuma was a nearby village that was a rival of Chicaca.
6
Juan Ortiz was the translator for the Soto mission. He had spent more than a decade in the southeast before the Soto mission began.
7
Iberville's Gulf Journals, translated and edited by Richebourg Gaillard McWilliams (University, Alabama: University of Alabama Press, 1981), 42–50.
8
As a measure of distance, “league” is an imprecise word, though when used by mariners, historians believe it is the equivalent of approximately three nautical miles.
9
Biscayans were large boats designed to be rowed or poled. Like life boats on modern vessels, they were stored aboard sailing vessels. When shallow water prevented a sailing vessel from reaching shore, sailors manned biscayans to do so.
10
Vermilion was a bright red or scarlet colored fabric, in this case likely made of wool.

-317-

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