The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760

By Robbie Ethridge; Charles Hudson | Go to book overview

Reconstructing the Coalescence of
Cherokee Communities in Southern
Appalachia
CHRISTOPHER B. RODNING

Several distinct groups of Cherokee towns formed within different areas of southern Appalachia during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries (fig. 1). Several of the Lower Towns along the headwaters of the Savannah River were located at or near mounds that may have been community centers from the eleventh through sixteenth centuries 1—during the 1700s, many people abandoned these towns because of conflicts with Creek and European groups. 2 The relationship between people in the Overhill Towns along the lower Little Tennessee River and earlier chiefdoms in the region before the sixteenth century is unclear 3—during the 1700s, these settlements received many refugees from the Middle and Lower towns. 4 The Middle Towns were settlements in the upper Little Tennessee River valley in southwestern North Carolina. Some Middle Towns were less than fifty miles away from Lower Cherokee settlements located in what is now northwestern South Carolina. The Out Towns were built close to ancient mounds along the Tuckasegee and Oconaluftee rivers east of the Little Tennessee. 5 The Valley Towns were close to Peachtree and other mounds in the upper Hiwassee watershed in the westernmost corner of North Carolina. 6 People in these five different groups of towns shared a common cultural and linguistic background and were probably related through matrilineal kinship. 7 There was little political centralization between or even within towns. 8 Leaders of towns were spokespersons for their communities, but their status did not grant them power over people in other towns. Different towns likely formed alliances with each other in different situations, but there were not paramount chiefs that ruled whole groups of towns. How did these relatively smallscale polities form out of the vestiges of earlier chiefdoms that flourished in the greater southern Appalachian region in earlier centuries? 9 What processes drove the coalescence of native communities in this region into the particular configuration in which English traders found them during

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 369

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.