The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760

By Robbie Ethridge; Charles Hudson | Go to book overview

Colonial Period Transformations in the
Mississippi Valley: Dis-integration,
Alliance, Confederation, Playoff
PATRICIA GALLOWAY

THE USUAL EXCUSES ON SOURCES

It took me a long time to get started on this paper, because it was not entirely clear what would be left for me to say once my colleagues had finished dealing with their topics: disease, population movements, and the influences of the Spanish in Florida and the English from colonies along the eastern seaboard would already have been dealt with. But as I looked over the list of papers, I saw that French colonial contacts had not been covered, nor did it seem apparent that anyone else would be concerned with the Indian view of events. As a result, I took up my assignment of dealing with the early part of the most recent 1 social history of the eastern side of the lower Mississippi Valley 2 with the intention of trying to accomplish four things: (1) recount the state of research on the ethnogenesis, political environment, and agency of four major tribes (Choctaw, Chickasaw, Natchez, and Tunica), with relevant comments on several “small tribes” who figured in the political economy of the region but are now virtually extinct as groups and on whom very little research beyond Swantonian surveys has been done (Chakchiuma, Yazoo, Ofo, Tioux, Grigra, Koroa, Houma, Capinan, Acolapissa, Biloxi, Pascagoula, etc.); (2) pay special attention to the impact of the French as they entered the region as explorers and colonials; (3) focus also on Native origin histories and other traditions that cast light on the period of interest; and (4) pay attention to how what people knew (or thought they knew) about one another affected the ways they acted or were able to act. In practice, the materials uncovered through attention to the three latter concerns will facilitate the accomplishment of the first.

Although Paul Kelton is of Cherokee ancestry, in this symposium we are hearing mostly Euroamerican voices describing other people's history, at a time when the very topic, the connection between the precontact

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 369

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.