Lollards and Their Influence in Late Medieval England

By Fiona Somerset; Jill C. Havens et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This volume has grown out of the scholarship presented in Lollard Society sessions in Kalamazoo and Leeds over the past five years. We thank all participants in those sessions, and most especially the contributors whose essays are included here.

Anne Hudson's continuing energetic scholarship has been a major force in creating the modern field of Lollard Studies. The publication of this collection will coincide with her retirement (from teaching, though assuredly not from active research), and while this volume is not formally a festschrift, it is nonetheless a celebration of her work. All of us are grateful to her for her support and help with this project.

Fiona Somerset would in addition like to thank those who have commented on her contributions and helped in formulating the volume as a whole: along with her fellow contributors, David Aers, Andrew Cole, Richard F. Green, Glending Olson, Paul Remley, Paul Strohm, Míceál Vaughan, Jim Weldon, and Nicholas Watson.

Jill C. Havens would like to thank her co-editors, Derrick Pitard and Fiona Somerset, as well as Margaret Aston, Simon Forde, Ralph Hanna, Wendy Scase, and Christina von Nolcken for their continuing support of the Lollard Society.

Derrick Pitard would especially like to thank all of those who have patiently helped with the Bibliography. Mishtooni Bose, Rita Copeland, Andrew Cole, Ralph Hanna, Jill Havens, Anne Hudson, Stephen Lahey, Ian Levy, Fiona Somerset, Georgi Vassilev and David Watt have at various times suggested additional sources, tracked down obscure and recalcitrant references, helped with unfamiliar languages, found more than a few errors, and extended my knowledge to new and unfamiliar areas. It is to be hoped that the result will be both worthy of their help and an aid to other scholars, both novice and experienced, interested in late medieval religion and culture.

We would also like to thank the staff at Boydell & Brewer, in particular Caroline Palmer for first suggesting the project, our anonymous reviewer for his/her very helpful comments on individual essays, Phillip Judge for his work on the map, and Pru Harrison for her efficient work on the volume's production.

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