From Yorktown to Valmy: The Transformation of the French Army in an Age of Revolution

By Samuel F. Scott | Go to book overview

2

EARLY EXPERIENCES IN RHODE ISLAND

IN SPITE OF PREPARATIONS to receive Rochambeau's forces in America, the arrival of the French was less than auspicious. Lafayette had returned to the United States in late April 1780 to inform Washington of Rochambeau's coming and to help get things ready for his army; with him had come Dominique Louis Ethis de Corny, a commissary charged with procuring supplies and provisions. Corny was to arrange for quarters, food, forage, bedding, firewood, horses for riding and hauling, wagons, and other necessities and— in anticipation of the effects of the ocean voyage—to provide hospital facilities. 1 One building Corny selected for this purpose belonged to the College of Rhode Island (now Brown University) in Providence. The college authorities, however, were opposed to the plan, and the citizens of Providence formally protested against it as a threat to public health, suggesting that tents would serve as well. Ultimately, it took an order from the Rhode Island Council of War to put the edifice at Corny's disposal. 2

Rochambeau's personal introduction to the United States was no happier. After anchoring in Newport harbor on July 11, he had gone ashore to find “not a person in the streets, gloomy and dismayed looks from the windows.” Shortly afterward, when French officers were observed publicly socializing with English officers who had been captured during the voyage, local inhabitants were outraged and local officials protested that these mutual enemies should be put away in cells on the French ships; similar resentments would reappear later in Franco-American relations. 3

Yet, there were some encouraging signs of cooperation. Governor William Greene gave Corny his full support and assistance. General Washing

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Yorktown to Valmy: The Transformation of the French Army in an Age of Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 251

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.