Nazi Psychoanalysis - Vol. 3

By Laurence A. Rickels | Go to book overview
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Nazi Psychoanalysis - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Nazi Psychoanalysis *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Achtung - A Preface to Nazi Psychoanalysis xv
  • Apart 1
  • It's Back! 3
  • Werther Report 11
  • How Many Siblings 14
  • Same Difference 17
  • Conversion 21
  • The Buff Object of Identification 28
  • The Body of His Work 31
  • Gotta Read Goette 36
  • U.S. is Them 40
  • Higher and Higher 45
  • Plane Talk 47
  • Lights! Action! Cut! 54
  • Double Burial 59
  • Therapists for Heyer 65
  • Shock Talk 72
  • Columns 77
  • Writing a Letter to Heyer 82
  • The Hand-Me-Down Book 91
  • Heyer and Heyer 96
  • Humanities 105
  • It Just Takes Two 108
  • Aircraft That Cannot Be 113
  • Panic Attack 122
  • Mars Attracts 127
  • Siegerkraft 129
  • The Psychotic Sublime 135
  • The Schreber Garden of Eden 150
  • Projection Therapy 157
  • Wishing Wells 166
  • It's Time 171
  • Dominik Gene 179
  • Countdown 191
  • Hotel Dominik 203
  • Doubles 209
  • Double Amnesia 211
  • Hunger 215
  • Exile on War Neurosis 222
  • On the Second Date 228
  • Manuals 235
  • Efficiency Pack 244
  • Gi Joey 252
  • Family Program 257
  • Family Outing 265
  • Therapy Values 275
  • Epilogue on Fire 285
  • Leave a Message, but Don't Forget to Breathe 287
  • The Teen Age 290
  • Middle Ages Crisis 292
  • Jung Frankenstein 296
  • Last Word 299
  • Primal Time 303
  • Wonders Never Cease 306
  • Tv Services 320
  • A Couple More Drags 324
  • Up in Smoke 326
  • References 329
  • Filmography 341
  • Index 343
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