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Introduction
1
Badiou is not even mentioned in either of the two most substantial recent English surveys of French philosophy in the twentieth century (Eric Matthews, Twentieth Century French Philosophy [1996]; Gary Gutting, French Philosophy in the Twentieth Century [2001]), and the Philosopher's Index through 1998 lists no articles referring to Badiou—as compared with 106 on Deleuze and 656 on Foucault. Along with my own “Generic Sovereignty” (1998), Slavoj Žižek's article “Psychoanalysis in Post-Marxism: The Case of Alain Badiou” (1998) was one of the first substantial engagements with Badiou to appear in English; a longer version appears in his recent The Ticklish Subject: The Absent Centre of Political Ontology (1999), and much of Žižek's work provides a highly pertinent point of comparison with that of Badiou. Jean-Jacques Lecercle's article (“Cantor, Lacan, Mao, Beckett, même combat: The Philosophy of Alain Badiou” [1999]) provides an especially accessible overview. See the bibliography for a list of current and forthcoming English translations of Badiou's work. Unsurprisingly perhaps, it is in Latin America that Badiou's philosophy has had the greatest immediate impact thus far. In addition to publishing translations and original contributions by Badiou, the Argentinian journal Acontecimiento has, for more than a decade now,

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