The Deathly Embrace: Orientalism and Asian American Identity

By Sheng-Mei Ma | Go to book overview

Bibliography and Filmography

Althusser, Louis. “Ideology and the Ideological State Apparatuses (Notes Towards an Investigation).” In Lenin and Philosophy and Other Essays, trans. Ben Brewster. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1971. 127–86.

Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London: Verso, 1983.

Andriola, Alfred. Charlie Chan. Papeete, Tahiti: Comics Stars in the World, 1976. Arendt, Hannah. Eichmann in Jerusalem. 1963. New York: Viking, 1966.

Bacho, Peter. “The Second Room.” In Dark Blue Suit and Other Stories. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1997. 39–53.

Bakhtin, M. M. The Dialogic Imagination. Ed. Michael Holquist, trans. Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981.

—. Rabelais and His World. Trans. Helene Iswolsky. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1968.

Barshay, Robert. “Ethnic Stereotypes in Flash Gordon.” Unpublished paper presented at the Popular Culture Association; a copy of the paper housed at the Special Collections of the Michigan State University Library, 1973.

Bataille, Georges. Eroticism. New York: Walker and Company, 1962.

Baudrillard, Jean. Simulacra and Simulation. Trans. Sheila Faria Glaser. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1994.

Bhabha, Homi K., ed. Nation and Narration. New York: Routledge, 1990.

Biggers, Earl Derr. The House without a Key. 1925. New York: Triangle, 1940.

Blanchard, Kendall. The Anthropology of Sport: An Introduction. Westport, Conn.: Bergin and Garvey, 1995.

Block, Alex Ben. The Legend of Bruce Lee. New York: Dell, 1974.

Bloom, Harold. “Introduction.” In Robinson Crusoe: Major Literary Characters, ed. Harold Bloom. New York: Chelsea House, 1995. 1–3.

Blythe, Will.”Remains of the Night.” Review of The Unconsoled, by Kazuo Ishiguro. New York, October 16, 1995, 64–65.

Brody, Jennifer DeVere. “Hyphen-Nations.” In Cruising the Performative: Interventions into the Representation of Ethnicity, Nationality, and Sexuality, ed. Sue-Ellen Case, Philip Brett, and Susan Leigh Foster. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995. 149–62.

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Deathly Embrace: Orientalism and Asian American Identity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 185

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.