Hayek on Hayek: An Autobiographical Dialogue

By Stephen Kresge; Leif Wenar | Go to book overview

PART FOUR

Chicago-Freiburg

The longest of my postwar visits to the United States before 1949 was the one in the spring and early summer of 1946, when I spent in succession two months each at the University of Chicago and Stanford University. It was during that period, when I had more free time than I had had for many years, that I seriously resumed work on the psychological ideas I had begun more than twenty-five years before and which were ultimately published in The Sensory Order.

After my visit [on the lecture tour in 1945], the financial temptation to do more semi-popular writing and lecturing was considerable, and some of my friends strongly urged me to stay and reap the possible harvest. Offers of various kinds were not wanting. But I felt neither attracted by this task nor thought that I had the skill to do it easily. Indeed I felt that this sort of popular lecturing and writing had a corrupting effect on one's mind and that in the long run I would do more for the political ideals I cared for if I stuck to strictly academic activities. But that I had for once exercised some practical influence and at the same time earned a fair amount of extra money made me feel entitled to take a complete holiday from practical concerns and to devote my energies for a while to wholly abstract problems. I probably also felt it as a smart that some of my more leftish acquaintances (with considerable cheek) gave me to understand that in their opinion I had ceased to be a scientist and had become a propagandist. At any rate, I decided that I would reward myself for

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hayek on Hayek: An Autobiographical Dialogue
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • The Collected Works of F.A.Hayek v
  • Contents vii
  • Editorial Foreword ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - Vienna-New York-Vienna 37
  • Part Two - London 75
  • Plates 84a
  • Part Three - A Parting in the Road 99
  • Part Four - Chicago-Freiburg 125
  • Publications and Letters Mentioned in Text 157
  • Index of Persons and Places 161
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.