Extra Bases: Reflections on Jackie Robinson, Race, and Baseball History

By Jules Tygiel | Go to book overview

THIRTEEN

Salaries Are Escalating, but
They Don't Guarantee Winning

Legendary baseball executive Branch Rickey reigned in the golden age of baseball management. “It was easy to figure out Mr. Rickey's thinking about contracts, ” remarked Chuck Connors, who played for the Brooklyn Dodgers before moving on to a more lucrative career as television's Rifleman. “He had both players and money—and just didn't like to see the two of them mix.”

Modern baseball executives, on the other hand, at least a select few of them, have lots of money and seem intent on throwing it at players. The Texas Rangers shelled out $252 million to secure the services of shortstop Alex Rodriguez for the next decade. The Boston Red Sox anteed up $160 million for eight years' worth of outfielder Manny Ramirez.

These signings, the mind-boggling totals notwithstanding, make at least a modicum of sense. Rodriguez, at the modest age of twenty-five, when most ballplayers enter their prime years, has already established himself as perhaps the greatest shortstop of all time. Ramirez, twenty-eight, has driven in 632 runs over the past five seasons.

But, as maverick owner Bill Veeck commented in the early years of free agency, one rarely overpays a superstar; it's the cost of the supporting cast that most often proves crippling. How, for example, can one explain the $55 million paid out by the Los Angeles Dodgers for pitcher Darren Dreifort? Dreifort, it's true, was the second choice in the 1993 amateur draft, taken just behind Rodriguez. Unlike A-Rod, however, he has yet to fully deliver on his potential. He has never won more than thirteen games in a season, never recorded an earned run average below four, never thrown two hundred innings or struck out two hundred batters in a season.

Time may ultimately prove this a wise investment for the Dodgers. The perennial shortage of even modestly talented pitchers clearly placed a premium on Dreifort's value. The Colorado Rockies reportedly offered him

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Extra Bases: Reflections on Jackie Robinson, Race, and Baseball History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 164

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.