Grant's Secret Service: The Intelligence War from Belmont to Appomattox

By William B. Feis | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Many people helped make this book possible, and though they deserve much credit and gratitude for their patience and advice, I willingly shoulder the blame for all errors. First, my deepest gratitude goes to my two graduate advisors at the University of Nebraska—Lincoln and The Ohio State University. Dr. Peter Maslowski was a model of scholarly professionalism who inspired me during my undergraduate and graduate days at UNL. Together we discovered the uncharted world of Civil War military intelligence and came up with the idea for this project. I believe the findings in this study more than justify our early enthusiasm. I am also thankful for his friendship and sage advice. His faith in me helped transform my love of history from infantile fascination to a profession. It is safe to say that, without Pete and his red pen, I would not be where I am today.

My dissertation advisor, Dr. Allan R. Millett, taught me so much about the Civil War, military history, and the historical profession, but I am most thankful for the wonderful friendship we developed while "campaigning” at Gettysburg, Carnifex Ferry, Franklin and Nashville, the Wilderness, and Shiloh. Without his guidance, vast knowledge of military history, and friendship, I would not be the historian I am. If my professional accomplishments even approached the level of his remarkable and distinguished career, I would consider myself fortunate. A finer scholar and "pard” would be hard to find.

The late Edwin C. Fishel, the dean of Civil War military intelligence, was with me in spirit every step of the way. His groundbreaking study of intelligence in the eastern theater, his experience in the intelligence business, and his mastery of the resources at the National Archives made my research much more profitable and enjoyable. From him I learned what it truly means to be a gentleman and a scholar. His willingness to share ideas, research notes, and insights gained from decades of research provided a model of scholarly cooperation and selflessness. Most of all, my long research trips to Washington were always brightened by the many dinners shared with Ed and his wife, Gladys, at the Cosmos Club. Those who study the "late unpleasantness” for a living as well as for fun owe a great debt to Ed Fishel.

I am also indebted to Michael Musick and Michael T. Meier of the

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Grant's Secret Service: The Intelligence War from Belmont to Appomattox
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.