Playing for Their Nation: Baseball and the American Military during World War II

By Steven R. Bullock | Go to book overview

Conclusion

By the end of World War II, the United States had endured nearly four years of continual sacrifice and hardship to soundly defeat the Axis Powers. During those years, millions of Americans answered the call, fighting in every corner of the globe to preserve the institutions of the nation. With the armed forces swollen to an extent never seen before or since, American military officials had to adapt quickly to accommodate this mass of humanity and maximize its formidable fighting potential. An important aspect of the training and success of these servicemen was maintaining a high level of morale. On the battlefield, this was accomplished primarily through such time-tested techniques as propaganda and providing adequate clothing, food, equipment. Away from the front lines, sustaining morale became somewhat more vague and difficult to establish. During their extensive down times, men often engaged in such behavior as drinking, gambling, and soliciting prostitutes, all of which was difficult to regulate and, some felt, sowed the seeds of discontent. To redirect the energies of soldiers and sailors into more constructive activities military leaders turned above all to athletics.

Because of baseball's popularity among American fighting men, the national pastime was the logical centerpiece for the military's athletic programs. By organizing teams of servicemen, officers aimed to inspire loyalty, camaraderie, and a sense of teamwork— all characteristics of high morale. Furthermore, whenever overtraining became an issue, military commanders utilized the game to preserve soldiers' and sailors' physical fitness without subjecting them to the tedium of repeated exercises.

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Playing for Their Nation: Baseball and the American Military during World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 183

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.