Mothers & Sons: Feminism, Masculinity, and the Struggle to Raise Our Sons

By Andrea O'Reilly | Go to book overview

Rashbaum conclude, “offers us one of our greatest hopes for transforming ourselves and the world in which we live-if we will but have the courage to make the necessary changes” ( 241).


NOTES
1.
As evidence of this, Backes cites the United States Library of Congress, which lists only seven titles between 1968 and the mid 1990s with “mothers and sons in literature” as a descriptor. Please see her article “Beyond the 'World of Guilt and Sorrow': Separation, Attachment, and Creativity in Literary Mothers and Sons” in The Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering 2:1(Spring/Summer 2000), pp. 28-45.
2.
Founded in the fall of 1998, The Association for Research on Mothering (ARM) is the first international feminist organization devoted specifically to the topic of mothering and motherhood. ARM is an association for scholars, writers, activists, professionals, agencies, policy makers, educators, parents, and artists. Its mandate is to provide a forum for the discussion and dissemination of feminist-academic and community grassroots-research, theory, and praxis on mothering-motherhood. It is committed in both membership and research to the inclusion of all mothers: First Nations mothers, immigrant and refugee mothers, working-class mothers, lesbian mothers, mothers with disabilities, mothers of color, and mothers from other marginalized groups. ARM also publishes biannually The Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering. The journal is an integral part of community building both for researchers-academics and grassroots-and for mothers interested in the topic of motherhood. Each issue of the journal highlights a particular motherhood theme or topic and showcases the newest and best in maternal scholarship as well as featuring numerous book reviews. Furthermore, through poetry, photography, and artwork, the journal gives voice to women's lived experiences of mothering in all their complexity and diversity. Please visit ARM's website for more information about the Association and its journal: http://www.yorku.ca/crm.
3.
This is examined at length in my two recent articles on Anglo-American feminist theory and the mother-daughter relation: “Across the Divide: Contemporary Anglo-American Feminist Theory on the Mother-Daughter Relationship, ” in Redefining Motherhood: Changing Identities and Patterns, ed. Sharon Abbey and Andrea O'Reilly (Toronto: Second Story Press, 1998), 69-91; and “Mothers, Daughters and Feminism Today: Empowerment, Agency, Narrative, ” Canadian Woman Studies 18:2 & 3 (Summer/Fall 1998): 16-21. See also the introduction to Mothers and Daughters: Connection, Empowerment, and Transformation, ed. Andrea O'Reilly and Sharon Abbey (New York: Rowman and Littlefield, 2000).
4.
For an excellent feminist critique of Bly and the Mythopoetic Men's Movement

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mothers & Sons: Feminism, Masculinity, and the Struggle to Raise Our Sons
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 19
  • Works Cited 20
  • I - Mothering and Motherhood 23
  • 1 - Who Are We This Time? 25
  • 2 - Mothering Sons with Special Needs 42
  • Works Cited 55
  • 3 - Masculinity, Matriarchy, and Myth a Black Feminist Perspective 56
  • Works Cited 69
  • 4 - Mothers, Sons, and the Art of Peacebuilding 71
  • Works Cited 88
  • 5 - In Black and White Anglo-American and African-American Perspectives on Mothers and Sons 91
  • Notes 116
  • Works Cited 117
  • II - Men and Masculinities 119
  • 6 - Swimming Against the Tide Feminists' Accounts of Mothering Sons 121
  • Notes 137
  • 7 - Feminist Academic Mothers' Influences on Their Sons' Masculinity 141
  • Works Cited 155
  • 8 - Lesbians Raising Sons Bringing Up a New Breed of Men 157
  • 9 - Can Boys Grow into Mothers? Maternal Thinking and Fathers' Reflections 163
  • III - Mothers and Sons: Connections and Disconnections 183
  • 10 - Raising Relational Boys 185
  • Notes 215
  • 11 - Attachment and Loss 217
  • Works Cited 233
  • 12 - Mother-Son Relationships in the Shadow of War 235
  • Notes 249
  • Works Cited 250
  • 13 - This is Leave-Taking Mothers, Signatures, and Countermemory 251
  • Notes 263
  • List of Contributors 265
  • Index 271
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.