Late Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1945-1972

By Dean A. Sullivan | Go to book overview

6
Baseball Confronts Modernity

The Houston Astrodome, which opened for business in 1965, was merely the most visible indication of the changes in the world of major league baseball in the mid-1960s. In the executive offices of the owners and the players, in the press box and the locker rooms, and on the field, transitions occurred that signaled an acceptance of (or a concession to) the cultural transformation of the 1950s and 1960s. It was unclear if any faction within baseball would benefit more than another in the new environment of the mid-1960s, and often positions changed rapidly or seemed contradictory.

Players embraced the new relationship they forged with owners in the first Basic Agreement between the MLBPA and the owners, even though many of them had to be convinced that the union's new leader, Marvin Miller, would not lead them to destruction instead. They resented the intrusive and seemingly irrelevant questions of a new breed of reporters, labeled "chipmunks” by offended traditionalist sportswriters, who advanced their own careers by celebrating the same sort of personal freedom later endorsed by Miller. However, one of the most beloved broadcasters in baseball history, Red Barber, fell victim to the reactionary Yankee management as he attempted to exercise his journalistic freedom.

Owners rang in the post—Ford Frick era by selecting General William Eckert as the new commissioner, but none ever claimed responsibility for orchestrating the event. Eckert's unwritten task was to weakly wield his newly enhanced authority, thereby allowing the owners to strengthen their influence over the commissioner's office which they had enjoyed under the cooperative Frick. The general fulfilled his destiny all too well, a failing

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Late Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1945-1972
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Late Innings *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • 1 - Baseball in the Post-Landis Era 1
  • 2 - Controversies Over Antitrust, Airwaves 41
  • 3 - Baseball Moves West 77
  • 4 - Continental Divides 119
  • 5 - Legislating Baseball 155
  • 6 - Baseball Confronts Modernity 195
  • 7 - The Era of Labor Unrest Begins 227
  • 8 - Counting Numbers, Dollars, and Rights 255
  • Bibliography 279
  • Acknowledgments 285
  • Index 287
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 299

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.