Late Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1945-1972

By Dean A. Sullivan | Go to book overview

Bibliography

The history of baseball in the third quarter of the twentieth century has been from countless perspectives by hundreds of writers. The best general history of the period is still David Quentin Voigt, American Baseball: From Postwar Expansion to the Electronic Age (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1983), although it is beginning to show its age. Veteran sportswriter Leonard Koppett, in Koppett's Concise History of Major League Baseball (Philadelphia: Temple Univer- sity Press, 1998), takes advantage of his press box seat to offer a unique combina- tion of description and analysis. Other recent histories include John P. Rossi, The National Game: Baseball and American Culture (Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 2000), and Jules Tygiel, Past Time: Baseball as History (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000), a chronologically arranged collection of essays. Still valuable are Benja- min G. Rader, Baseball: A History of America's Game (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1992), and Charles C. Alexander, Our Game: An American Baseball History (New York: Henry Holt, 1991). Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns, Baseball: An Illustrated History (New York: Knopf, 1994); Daniel Okrent and Harris Lewine, eds., The Ultimate Baseball Book (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1979); and Lawrence Ritter and Donald Honig, The Image of Their Greatness: An Illustrated History of Baseball from 1900 to the Present (New York: Crown, 1979) are attractive, if some- what basic, summaries of baseball history. An invaluable compilation of arcane and essential baseball information can be found in Jonathan Fraser Light, The Cultural Encyclopedia of Baseball (Jefferson NC: McFarland, 1997).

In recent years more writers have chosen to focus on one particular season or era. The most comprehensive analysis of this type is William Marshall, Baseball's Pivotal Era: 1945—1951 (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1999), in which Marshall—who oversees the papers of former commissioner Albert "Happy” Chandler—mines these papers and scores of interviews with Chandler's contem- poraries to create a masterful examination of these years. John P. Rossi, A Whole New Game: Off the Field Changes in Baseball, 1946—1960 (Jefferson NC: McFarland, 1999), competently summarizes his time period. Philip Baste, Dog Days: The New York Yankees' Fall from Grace and Return to Glory, 1964—1976 (New York: Random House, 1994), succeeds in capturing his colorful subject. Historian Bruce Kuklick takes a different tack with his nostalgic evocation of the impact of baseball on the neighborhood around one of Philadelphia's major league stadiums in To Every- thing a Season: Shibe Park and Urban Philadelphia, 1909—1976 (Princeton: Prince-

-279-

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Late Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1945-1972
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Late Innings *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • 1 - Baseball in the Post-Landis Era 1
  • 2 - Controversies Over Antitrust, Airwaves 41
  • 3 - Baseball Moves West 77
  • 4 - Continental Divides 119
  • 5 - Legislating Baseball 155
  • 6 - Baseball Confronts Modernity 195
  • 7 - The Era of Labor Unrest Begins 227
  • 8 - Counting Numbers, Dollars, and Rights 255
  • Bibliography 279
  • Acknowledgments 285
  • Index 287
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