Hopi Tales of Destruction

By Ekkehart Malotki; Lorena Lomatuway'Ma et al. | Go to book overview

SIX

The End of Hovi'itstuyqa

INTRODUCTION

Hovi'itstuyqa is the Hopi place-name for Mount Elden, a ridge-shaped volcanic dome along the southern flank of the San Francisco Mountains near Flagstaff, Arizona. Distinguished by thick, pasty extrusions of hardened magma, its promontory features a little point that juts skyward. This topographical configuration, which is clearly discernible against the horizon as one approaches the mountain from the northeast, apparently reminded the Hopi of buttocks (hoovi) sticking out (itsta), for this is what Hovi'itstuyqa implies: “Buttocks Sticking Out Point.”

To date, it has been impossible to positively locate the ruin site associated with the place-name. Nequatewa, who published the only other version on the demise of Hovi'itstuyqa (1938:37), believed that it was identical with Elden Pueblo at the foot of Mount Elden in Flagstaff. However, Elden Pueblo, after which the archaeological period between A.D. 1130 and 1200 has been named Elden Phase, is generally known as Pasiwvi to the Hopi (Pilles cited in Malotki and Lomatuway'ma 1987:115). During the Elden Phase, termed the “Golden Age of the Sinagua” culture by Peter Pilles, the Sinagua populated the entire region from Wupatki to the north, Anderson Mesa to the east, and the Verde Valley to the south of the San Francisco Mountains. Malcolm Farmer has consequently suggested (1955:44) that Hovi'itstuyqa could have been one of many sites known to have been occupied in late prehistoric times in the Flagstaff area (Turkey Hill Pueblo, A.D. 1150 to 1200, and Old Caves Pueblo, A.D. 1250 to 1300), along Anderson Mesa (Kinnikinick Pueblo, A.D. 1200 to 1325; Grape Vine Pueblo, A.D. 1300 to 1400; and the Pollock Site, A.D. 1250 to 1325), and in the Verde Valley (Montezuma Castle, which was occupied as late as A.D. 1425).

According to the present legend, Tupats'ovi, the home village of the protagonist, was situated on Nuvakwewtaqa, the Hopi name for the Chavez

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Hopi Tales of Destruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Hopi Tales of Destruction *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • One - Hisatsongoopavi: Devastation by Earthquake *
  • Two - The Downfall of Qa'ötaqtipu *
  • Three - Pivanhonkyapi: Destruction by Fire *
  • Four - The Demise of Sikyatki *
  • Five - The Abandonment of Huk'Ovi *
  • Six - The End of Hovi'Itstuyqa *
  • Seven - The Annihilation of Awat'Ovi *
  • Glossary *
  • Bibliography *
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