Hopi Tales of Destruction

By Ekkehart Malotki; Lorena Lomatuway'Ma et al. | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Baker, Shane A. 1994. “The Question of Cannibalism and Violence in the Anasazi Culture: A Case Study from San Juan County.” Blue Mountain Shadows 13:30—41.

Bandelier, Adolph F. 1976 [1892]. “Final Report of Investigations among the Indians of the Southwestern United States, Carried on Mainly in the Years from 1880 to 1885.” Papers of the Archaeological Institute of America. American Series, vol. 4, pt. 2. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Reprint New York: AMS Press.

Bartlett, Katharine. 1934. “Spanish Contact with the Hopi: 1540—1823.” Museum of Northern Arizona Notes 6(12):55—60.

Bascom, William R. 1955. “Verbal Art.” Journal of American Folklore 68:245—252.

Beaglehole, Ernest, and Pearl Beaglehole. 1935. “Hopi of the Second Mesa.” American Anthropological Association Memoirs 44:1—65.

Benedict, Ruth. 1959 [1934]. Patterns of Culture. 2d ed. with a new preface by Margaret Mead. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Bourke, John G. 1984 [1884]. The Snake-Dance of the Moquis of Arizona. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Brew, John Otis. 1941. “Preliminary Report of the Peabody Museum Awatovi Expedition of 1939.” Plateau 13(3):37—48.

— . 1979. “Hopi Prehistory and History to 1850.” In Handbook of North American Indians, vol. 9. Southwest. Alfonso Ortiz, ed. Pp. 514—523. Washington DC: Smithsonian Institution.

Colton, Harold S. 1959. Hopi Kachina Dolls with a Key to Their Identification. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.

Colton, Harold S., and Edmund Nequatewa. 1932. “The Ladder Dance: Two Traditions of an Extinct Hopi Ceremonial.” Museum of Northern Arizona Notes 5(2):5—12.

Colton, Mary-Russel Farrell, Edmund Nequatewa, and Harold S. Colton. 1933. “Hopi Legends of the Sunset Crater Region.” Museum of Northern Arizona Notes 5(4):17—23.

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Hopi Tales of Destruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Hopi Tales of Destruction *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • One - Hisatsongoopavi: Devastation by Earthquake *
  • Two - The Downfall of Qa'ötaqtipu *
  • Three - Pivanhonkyapi: Destruction by Fire *
  • Four - The Demise of Sikyatki *
  • Five - The Abandonment of Huk'Ovi *
  • Six - The End of Hovi'Itstuyqa *
  • Seven - The Annihilation of Awat'Ovi *
  • Glossary *
  • Bibliography *
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