Pirates of Venus

By Edgar Rice Burroughs; F. Paul Wilson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT

On Board the Sofal

Hovering just above us, I saw what at first appeared to be five enormous birds, but which I soon recognized, despite my incredulity, as winged men. They were armed with swords and daggers, and each carried a long rope at the end of which dangled a wire noose.

“Voo klangan!” shouted Kamlot. (The birdmen!)

Even as he spoke a couple of wire nooses settled around each of us. We struggled to free ourselves, striking at the snares with our swords, but our blades made no impression upon the wires, and the ropes to which they were attached were beyond our reach. As we battled futilely to disengage ourselves, the klangan settled to the ground, each pair upon opposite sides of the victim they had snared. Thus they held us so that we were helpless, as two cowboys hold a roped steer, while the fifth angan approached us with drawn sword and disarmed us. (Perhaps I should explain that angan is singular, klangan plural, plurals of Amtorian words being formed by prefixing kloo to words commencing with a consonant and kl to those commencing with a vowel.)

Our capture had been accomplished so quickly and so deftly that it was over, with little or no effort on the part of the birdmen, before I had had time to recover from the astonishment that their weird appearance induced. I now recalled having heard Danus speak of voo klangan upon one or two occasions, but I had thought that he referred to poultry

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Pirates of Venus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Pirates of Venus *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction *
  • Chapter One - Carson Napier *
  • Chapter Two - Off for Mars *
  • Chapter Three - Rushing Toward Venus *
  • Chapter Four - To the House of the King *
  • Chapter Five - The Girl in the Garden *
  • Chapter Six - Gathering Tarel *
  • Chapter Seven - By Kamlot's Grave *
  • Chapter Eight - On Board the Sofal *
  • Chapter Nine - Soldiers of Liberty *
  • Chapter Ten - Mutiny *
  • Chapter Eleven - Duare *
  • Chapter Twelve - “a Ship!” *
  • Chapter Thirteen - Catastrophe *
  • Chapter Fourteen - Storm *
  • In Defense of Carson Napier *
  • Glossary *
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