Moving Image Theory: Ecological Considerations

By Joseph D. Anderson; Barbara Fisher Anderson | Go to book overview

2

The Value of Oriented Geometry for Ecological
Psychology and Moving Image Art

Robert E. Shaw

William M. Mace

SCIENTISTS AND ARTISTS share the same environmental habitat (roughly, where they live) but occupy distinct, somewhat intersecting econiches (roughly, how they live). Although evolving within the same natural frame, their arenas of life are so dramatically different—the former tending toward the rational and the latter toward the expressive—that no easy comparison can be made of their methods or content. Yet, they have much in common. For instance, they have both made major contributions to the broadening of our culture of shared experiences. Such experiences are of two kinds: first, those that arise from direct perception of the environment, something all animals have in common; and, second, those that arise vicariously, as second-hand experiences, through indirect perception, or the use of substitutes for the real thing.

Historically, humankind has distinguished itself from other species by its attempt to produce a vision of nature—to produce records of that vision, with various degrees of fidelity and stylistic expression, to be shared and appreciated by others. Where art has pioneered our expressive side through poetry, dramaturgy, painting, sculpture, and music, among other things, science has advanced our rational side through basic research, theory, and technology. Milestones for both science and art were the discovery of various means for reproducing objects and events of general social interest vis à vis drawing, sculpting, painting, writing, printing, the telegraph, the telephone, photography, the phonograph, radio, movies, television, and computers. Drawings or paintings of people, landscapes, seascapes, or social events, such as sports, dance, travels, and trials, when framed and hung in a public place, become sources that capture some of the information contained in artists' once-personal experiences but which can now be shared publicly by many. Let's consider more carefully what this act of reproducing might entail.

We are so familiar with various forms of reproduction that we scarcely recognize what marvels they really are. Why do they work? There are two fundamental reasons: one having to do with intentionality, the other with causality. First, the very nature of one object, the object of intention, being in some way a reproduction of another object, the object of reference, is that the first refers beyond itself to the second. This is what is meant by the intention of the first being to refer to the second. To refer entails, at least, that when we perceive the first object, something about it formally resembles the reference object, and that thus in our experiencing the first, there is some part that would agree with our experiencing the second if such experiencing should occur. Second, there must be a causal basis for such intentional reference. But the nature of the referential relationship between the two objects is such that the absence of information about their causal connection does not mean absence of information about their intentional con

-28-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Moving Image Theory: Ecological Considerations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.