Moving Image Theory: Ecological Considerations

By Joseph D. Anderson; Barbara Fisher Anderson | Go to book overview

Part Three

Acoustic Events

A SOUND-EFFECTS EDITOR for a motion picture begins his work by viewing a scene in which people are moving about on the screen, interacting with each other and with objects and structures in their environment. And usually the sounds of their footsteps, their opening and closing of doors, their pouring and drinking of liquids, as well as the roar of their engines, the squealing of their tires, and the blasts of their guns, have been recorded along with the picture. For a movie in which all the sound has been recorded synchronously with the picture, it would seem that the sound-effects editor would have little to do. But nothing could be farther from actual practice, for in contemporary motion pictures, most, if not all, of the incidental sounds are replaced or enhanced. This poses a major problem for our understanding of motion-picture realism, for it would seem self-evident that the sounds of the action recorded at the time of the action are the most realistic possible and that any replacement or enhancement could only result in less realism.

We recall editing a scene in which the protagonist is trapped in a blind alley and eludes his pursuers by climbing a fire escape up the side of a building to the rooftop. In actuality the steel stairway was very rigid and secured firmly to the building. The sounds made by the steel structure as his feet rapidly ascended the steps made it seem solid and safe. We listened to these sounds recorded at the same time as the picture and judged that they would have to be replaced. (This, by the way, is the judgment rendered by almost every sound-effects editor with regard to almost every production-track effect.) But why did we want to change the sounds? Why did they feel wrong? They were the sounds actually made by the climbing of the fire escape. Do they not qualify as realistic?

The sounds that we heard accompanying the actor climbing the fire escape were indeed realistic. They accurately conveyed the information that the actor was climbing a well-constructed and well-maintained metal stairway and that he was in no danger. In fact, the scene had been rehearsed several times, and the actor with camera and sound crews in tow had each time made the ascent quite safely. But our job was to construct a fictional scene in which the character was in great jeopardy and the outcome of his effort to escape tinged with uncertainty. What was needed was a fire escape that sounded creaky, loosely attached to the supporting building, and dangerous to climb. We obtained some loosely fabricated pieces of metal and by trampling upon them achieved sounds that seemed much better.

The foleyed sounds were in fact much better because they were more realistic, not for the profilmic event but for the fictional event. With the new sounds, the scene was no longer of an actor climbing a safe set of stairs but of the character fleeing for his life up a flight of open metal steps so precariously attached to the side of an old building that the outcome of his attempt was in grave doubt. These sounds were entirely appropriate and ultimately realistic for the fictional world of the movie. The insight to be gained is

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Moving Image Theory: Ecological Considerations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.