Germaine de Staël, George Sand, and the Victorian Woman Artist

By Linda M. Lewis | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

TRUDY LEWIS AND DIANE LONG HOEVELER read various pieces of this manuscript and offered helpful insights; to both I express my gratitude. I also thank J. David Arnott, whose musical knowledge I exploited, and Marguerite Dorsch, whose French skills augmented my deficiencies. Conversations with Philip Cole- man-Hull helped me clarify certain aesthetic notions, and I gratefully acknowledge such rich colloquy. Bethany College librarian Elaine Bean provided invaluable assistance in locating obscure literary texts; I am grateful to her and to Denise Carson, library director. I am especially indebted to two perceptive readers selected by the University of Missouri Press. Their identities are unknown to me, but their thoughtful and detailed commentary was of enormous value as I revised. A thousand thanks to both.

Institutions deserving acknowledgment include Bethany College for the 2000—2001 sabbatical leave in which I wrote the initial draft of the book, the libraries of the University of Wisconsin—Madison and the University of Kansas, the New York City Public Library, and especially the University of Missouri Press. The professionalism of Editor-in-Chief Beverly Jarrett and her excellent staff merits all the thankfulness I can express. Clair Willcox, Jane Lago, and Julianna Schroeder of the press have been invariably patient and generous.

I am grateful to my husband, Frank Lewis, who lived with me as I lived within this book. His forbearance and good humor sustain me. In addition I enjoy the love and faith of a wonderful family: Terry, Trudy, Mike, Tom, Sylvia, Cliff, Lauren, Madeline, Nicholas, Edward, and Jude—my children and grandchildren.

This book owes much to the late Margaret H. Mountcastle, whose generous gift funds the Mountcastle Distinguished Chair of Humanities at Bethany College. When I was appointed as Mountcastle Professor, my patron and I embarked on an epistolary friendship, and her enthusiastic support of this project ceased only with her death in 2002. The book is fondly dedicated to her memory.

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