Germaine de Staël, George Sand, and the Victorian Woman Artist

By Linda M. Lewis | Go to book overview

INDEX
Actress of the Present Day, The: and the woman artist, 74, 79
Alcott, Louisa May: on women artists, 7; Diana and Persis,232
American Review,113
Amiel, Henri Frédéric: Journal Intime,204, 224
Anderson, Mary (actress), 214, 228
Anglicanism: and patriotism, 31
Apollo: and artist, 8; and Pythian, 18, 113
Apuleius, Lucius: Metamorphoses and Psyche, 58, 121, 122, 128
Arachne, myth of: and female art, 5
Ariadne, myth of: and female art, 5
Aristotle: on gender, 2
Arnold, Matthew: on Sand, 17, 42; and Mrs. Ward, 209; mentioned, 207
Athena/Minerva: as wisdom and artisan, 2, 18, 19, 35
Athenaeum: and Jewsbury, 67, 87
Augustine, Saint: City of God,19
Austen, Jane: and Corinne,15; as innovator, 210; mentioned, 10, 70
Balzac, Honoré de: and Sand, 1, 22
Barr, Amelia: as writer and breadwinner, 65
Barthes, Roland: on woman's role, 3
Bashkirtseff, Marie (painter), 233, 234; as source for Mrs. Ward, 239
Baudelaire, Charles: on actresses, 74; on woman as muse, 83
Beauvoir, Simone de: on woman as Other, 3; on Sand, 16
Beethoven: as Romantic artist, 7, 22, 63; and Fidelio,195
Bernhardt, Sarah, 228
Blackwell, John: editor of Eliot's novels, 136, 163, 175, 187
Blackwood's Magazine,106
Blanc, Louis: and Sand, 17; and political theory, 119
Blind, Mathilde: on Sand and Eliot, 141
Boccaccio, Giovanni: and Barrett Browning, 130; mentioned, 154
Bodichon, Barbara: and Eliot, 102; feminist and artist, 97; as source for Romola,162
Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus: Consolation of Philosophy,20
Bonaparte, Napoleon. See Napoleon
Braddon, Mary Elizabeth (novelist), 66
Breslau, Louise (painter), 233
Brontë, Anne: and pseudonym, 2; and female artist, 7; The Tenant of Wildfell Hall,73, 243
Brontë, Branwell, 179
Brontë, Charlotte: and pseudonym, 2; female artist, 7; and Eliot, 12; as influenced by Sand, 17; on women professionals, 66, 73, 74, 75, 232; Villette,74, 210, 228, 243; Jane Eyre,98, 112, 232, 238; influence on Barrett Browning's Aurora Leigh,112; and heroines, 143, 243
Brontë, Emily: and pseudonym, 2; and heroine, 143, 152; influence on Ward's David Grieve,230
Browning, Elizabeth Barrett: and patriarchy, 1; and courtship with Robert Browning, 1, 102— 3; and influences, 3, 11, 12; on artist and narcissism, 6; and Psyche myth, 11, 101; and Staël's Corinne, 13, 15, 16, 106—16 passim; and Sand, 13, 17, 102, 103, 104, 118; on socialism, 16, 110, 119; on female Wisdom, 21; on Staël and Byron, 23; on Jewsbury, 97; “To George Sand: A Desire” and “To

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