Staging America: Cornerstone and Community-Based Theater

By Sonja Kuftinec | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

ommunity-based theater is an inclusive enterprise, and its scholarship Cno less so. Over the eight years since this project began at Stanford University, I have received invaluable support and feedback from colleagues, friends, and critics. In early stages, fellow graduate students Caroline Bicks, Kirstie Gulick Rosenfield, and Ehren Fordyce offered comments, camaraderie, and coffee. Ron Davies proffered his vast technological, editorial, and administrative skills. Conversations with Bruce McConachie, Doug Paterson, Tobin Nelhaus, David Feiner, and Mark Weinberg stimulated both thought and praxis. Jan Cohen-Cruz imparted warm, insightful feedback at many stages of the book's development, as did my colleagues at the University of Minnesota, Michal Kobialka, Tamara Underiner, Matthew Wagner, and Aleksandra Wolska. The University of Minnesota College of Liberal Arts also supported me with a leave term, and the Office of the Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School supported the project with a Grant in Aid, which included the extraordinary assistance of graduate student John Fletcher. John served as a textual dramaturg, procuring obscure source materials and offering witty, engaged editorial feedback and unflagging support. Several times he suggested articles or ideas that significantly strengthened the book's focus while elegantly refining its arguments. John's summer internship with Cornerstone in Fresno, California, lent him an informed critical awareness, and I thank California State Universities for helping to support this work. Andy Arsham provided the expertise of a humanist scientist, dissecting improbable clauses, and offered endless encouragement. An inclusive research process relied on input from Cornerstone Theater, whose many members proved essential in their openness, support, and critique of the project, beginning with my friend Patty Payette, who introduced me to the company. During a residency in 1994, I was invited to listen and at times to participate in ensemble meetings, planning days, and several projects in Watts. Input from participants in Watts, Anacostia, and New Haven and at Arena Stage kept me humble about the limits of my knowledge and alive to the impact of theater on individuals.

-xvii-

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