Staging America: Cornerstone and Community-Based Theater

By Sonja Kuftinec | Go to book overview

1

INTRODUCTION: SURVEYING THE TERRAIN

I begin a work based on many years of participation and reflection in the theater with the confession of a guilty secret: I often don't like going. I approach most productions with a dull sense of dread and a faint whiff of hope. The dread arises from years of attending overproduced deadly professional and academic theater. 1 The hope mainly emanates from experimental student and community-based productions, grounded in locality, place, or identity. These community-based productions, which I have both witnessed and helped to develop, reinspire my faith in theater's ability to directly engage and reflect its audience, by integrating local history, concerns, stories, traditions, and/or performers. At the same time, the work raises deeply provocative questions about ethical representation and about how individuals and groups negotiate their identity. Yet, these socially and aesthetically complex productions, affiliated with various twentieth-century theater movements in the United States, remain largely absent from a conventional narrative of American theater. While practitioners have been speaking with each other for quite a while, and, less often, with scholars and scholar-practitioners, a wider audience remains predominately unaware of community-based theater's impact. In order to understand and complicate issues of identity fundamental to the ongoing negotiation of “America, ” and to apprehend aspects of audience engagement crucial to the vitality of American theater, this field must be more explicitly surveyed. 2

Staging America introduces aspects of this critical landscape through focus on Cornerstone Theater, a fluid ensemble that has been developing a community-based aesthetic and practice for over sixteen years. Founded in 1986 as a response to the limitations of regional theater in reaching a more broad-based audience, Cornerstone spent five years traveling and produc

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Staging America: Cornerstone and Community-Based Theater
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 255

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.